Feet Need Christmas Gifts Too!

November 30, 2008 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Uncategorized 

A few days ago I published the November issue of my Fixing Your Feet E-zine. I wanted to share the best of the best Christmas gift list for your feet. If you saw the list there, I apologize for the duplication, but I wanted to make sure both the e-zine and the blog subscribers saw it.

You’ll see most of these are available at <strong>ZombieRunner.com</strong>. They have easily become the place to shop for all your foot care supplies, along with a huge assortment of other supplies – top to bottom – shoes to caps. Put a few of these on your list and then order some for your friends.

Drymax Socks – These socks are the best I have ever seen. Their Dual Layer Sweat Removal System has two different fibers interwoven together – a moisture hating Drymax fibers on the inside and moisture attracting fibers on the outside. The socks are made in a large variety of styles and heights. From trail, to road, from running to hiking and every other sport, these are the socks that work to protect your feet from moisture. Drymax socks are available through Zombierunner.com.

Hydropel Sports Ointment – This lubricant is one of the best because it protects the skin from moisture. In a test by BackpackingLight.com, Hydropel was the best at repelling moisture away from the skin. Provided protection from chaffing too. Hydropel is available through Zombierunner.com.

Kinesio Tex Tape – This is my favorite tape. Kinesio Tex tape is a very thin, porous cotton fabric with a medical grade acrylic adhesive. A special method of adhesive application and the porous nature of the fabric allows the skin to breathe. It's designed for a 30 to 40% longitudinal only stretch and when applied lifts the skin to provide support for surrounding soft tissue. It is designed to be worn for 3 to 4 days and with proper application will withstand water and moisture on the skin. Great for toes, ball of the feet, and heels. Comes in one-, two-, and three-inch widths. Kinesio Tex tape is available through Zombierunner.com.

Spenco 2nd Skin Blister Pads and Quikstick Adhesive Dressings – The Blister Pads are a hydrocolloid pad bordered by a thin film helps keep blisters from drying out, absorbs perspiration and helps promote a scab-free, naturally healed blister. QuikStik Adhesive Dressings combine a soft, moist hydrogel pad with an ultrathin adhesive film. These pads are ideal for blister repair during or after a run and help blisters heal fast. Both pads are available through Zombierunner.com.

Engo Blister Prevention Patches – Engo has made these patches to be applied to your footwear, not your feet. The blue patch can be applied to your insoles or shoes to provide exceptional friction protection. Put on a dry surface, they stick like crazy. Comes in a large rectangle and two oval sizes. The patches can be trimmed to fit anywhere. Engo Blister Prevention patches are available through Zombierunner.com.

Injinji Toe Socks – These tetratsoks are becoming the choice of many amateur and professionals athletes. These toe socks are constructed with an inner lining made of CoolMax® and a resistant outer shell of Lycra. Their Anatomical Interface System is engineered to separate your toes with a thin, anti-friction membrane that is both lightweight and breathable. Seamless in construction, the tetratsok forms to every contour of your foot. This allows for true restriction free movement from your heel to five toes, encourages healthy circulation, and eliminates skin on skin contact between your toes to prevent blisters from developing. Injinji socks are available through Zombierunner.com.

Moeben Sleeves – These UV protected arm sleeves are made for athletes. They are a fairly snug band of fabric that you wear like sleeves, without the shirt – wrist to arm pit. They keep the arms warm, protect them from branches and bugs, and offer sunburn protection. Shannon Farar-Griefer, an ultrarunner with Badwater experience, makes Moben sleeves. After a scare with a skin lesion on her arm, she created the sleeves. They are available in a myriad of colors and patterns, and three fabrics: nylon/spandex or poly/spandex, light fleece, and an organic fabric. Shannon sells the sleeves through Zombierunner.com.

Fixing Your Feet: Prevention and Treatments for Athletes – The 4th edition can be ordered through my FixingYourFeet.com web site, ZombieRunner.com, or Amazon.com. If you have any of the older editions, it’s time to get this one. It has three new chapters, lots of new sections, and is completely updated. At 350+ pages, it’s chocked full of resources.

Road ID – Having your personal information on your person when out and about is important. We never know when an accident might happen. RoadID has been around for years. They now offer the popular Fix ID, and other models: Wrist ID, Ankle ID, and Shoe Pouch ID. Available at Road Id.

Fixing Your Feet Ezine – Three Tips and Christmas Gifts

November 27, 2008 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Foot Care, Footwear, Health, Sports, Travel 

FIXING YOUR FEET E-zine

Volume 8, Issue 11, November 2008 ~
John Vonhof, Footwork Publications ~
Copyright, November 2008, All rights reserved

THIS ISSUE IN SUMMARY

This issue has an editorial on Three Important Tips, an article on the Best Christmas Gifts, a new bad feet photo, and reader feedback.

PURPOSE

The Fixing Your Feet E-zine is published monthly to inform and educate athletes and non-athletes about proper foot care skills and techniques, provide tips on foot care, review foot care products, and highlight problems people have with their feet.

EDITORIAL: THREE IMPORTANT TIPS

I met Melissa Griffiths, an adventure racer from California, as she was preparing for Raid the North Extreme in BC Canada in June 2007. We emailed back and forth as she told me of her woes with her feet.

Melissa told me here story, “I’ve been adventure racing for about six years with a particular weakness for expeditions. As an adventure racer, foot care is high on the list of priorities as failure to look after one’s feet can often lead to failure to finish the race. Before I met John my foot care was extremely basic. I’d trim my toenails once every few weeks and possibly change socks on a long trek. This came to bite me during Raid the North Extreme in British Columbia. The combination of wet feet for 2 days and poor foot care made the race extremely miserable for me. It was during this race that I met John. He gave me 3 tips, which have proven invaluable and since then I’ve had little to no issues with my feet. The advice is very basic but extremely effective:

  1. Keep your toenails short. Really short. I file my nails every night and pay particular attention to rounding off the edges. They should feel smooth all the way round.
  2. Hard skin does not protect your feet! I used to think that having a callous was good as it protected the area but it just creates an area for blisters to form. I now file my feet every night with a pumice stone and moisturize thoroughly.
  3. Wear good socks. Get rid of the old favorites and invest in something decent. Try the new CoolMax, they do a good job of keeping feet dry and happy.

Since practicing these tips over the last year I’ve noticed a dramatic difference. Although my feet will always still get sore due to the demands of a race, I have significantly improved the wear and tear and have eliminated the need to visit John in the middle of a race! (much to my dismay).”

Three tips. Three important tips that can save your race. Do you have a routine? Melissa found what she needed to do, and since taking these three tips to heart, has had better luck with her feet.

You can do the same. If you have struggled with the same foot care issues month after month, or race after race, give it a try.

If you want to comment on this piece, please send me an email.

SHARE THIS NEWSLETTER

Please take a moment and forward this issue to a friend or two and encourage them to subscribe.

FEATURE ARTICLE: CHRISTMAS GIFTS

Christmas will be here soon and with it comes gift-giving. Here is my list of the best of the best. You’ll see most of these are available at ZombieRunner.com. They have easily become the place to shop for all your foot care supplies, along with a huge assortment of other supplies – top to bottom – shoes to caps. Put a few of these on your list and then order some for your friends.

Sock_maximum_protection_running
Drymax Socks – These socks are the best I have ever seen. Their Dual Layer Sweat Removal System has two different fibers interwoven together – a moisture hating Drymax fibers on the inside and moisture attracting fibers on the outside. The socks are made in a large variety of styles and heights. From trail, to road, from running to hiking and every other sport, these are the socks that work to protect your feet from moisture. Drymax socks are available through Zombierunner.com.

Hydropel_taller
Hydropel Sports Ointment – This lubricant is one of the best because it protects the skin from moisture. In a test by BackpackingLight.com, Hydropel was the best at repelling moisture away from the skin. Provided protection from chaffing too. Hydropel is available through Zombierunner.com.

Kinesio_gold_blue
Kinesio Tex Tape – This is my favorite tape. Kinesio Tex tape is a very thin, porous cotton fabric with a medical grade acrylic adhesive. A special method of adhesive application and the porous nature of the fabric allows the skin to breathe. It’s designed for a 30 to 40% longitudinal only stretch and when applied lifts the skin to provide support for surrounding soft tissue. It is designed to be worn for 3 to 4 days and with proper application will withstand water and moisture on the skin. Great for toes, ball of the feet, and heels. Comes in one-, two-, and three-inch widths. Kinesio Tex tape is available through Zombierunner.com.

Quikstik_large
Spenco 2nd Skin Blister Pads and Quikstick Adhesive Dressings – The Blister Pads are a hydrocolloid pad bordered by a thin film helps keep blisters from drying out, absorbs perspiration and helps promote a scab-free, naturally healed blister. QuikStik Adhesive Dressings combine a soft, moist hydrogel pad with an ultrathin adhesive film. These pads are ideal for blister repair during or after a run and help blisters heal fast. Both pads are available through Zombierunner.com.

Engo-package-front
Engo Blister Prevention Patches – Engo has made these patches to be applied to your footwear, not your feet. The blue patch can be applied to your insoles or shoes to provide exceptional friction protection. Put on a dry surface, they stick like crazy. Comes in a large rectangle and two oval sizes. The patches can be trimmed to fit anywhere. Engo Blister Prevention patches are available through Zombierunner.com.

Outdoor_quarter
Injinji Toe Socks – These tetratsoks are becoming the choice of many amateur and professionals athletes. These toe socks are constructed with an inner lining made of CoolMax® and a resistant outer shell of Lycra. Their Anatomical Interface System is engineered to separate your toes with a thin, anti-friction membrane that is both lightweight and breathable. Seamless in construction, the tetratsok forms to every contour of your foot. This allows for true restriction free movement from your heel to five toes, encourages healthy circulation, and eliminates skin on skin contact between your toes to prevent blisters from developing. Injinji socks are available through Zombierunner.com.

White
Moeben Sleeves – These UV protected arm sleeves are made for athletes. They are a fairly snug band of fabric that you wear like sleeves, without the shirt – wrist to arm pit. They keep the arms warm, protect them from branches and bugs, and offer sunburn protection. Shannon Farar-Griefer, an ultrarunner with Badwater experience, makes Moben sleeves. After a scare with a skin lesion on her arm, she created the sleeves. They are available in a myriad of colors and patterns, and three fabrics: nylon/spandex or poly/spandex, light fleece, and an organic fabric. Shannon sells the sleeves through Zombierunner.com.

Fixing Your Feet: Prevention and Treatments for Athletes – The 4th edition can be ordered through my FixingYourFeet.com web site, ZombieRunner.com, or Amazon.com. If you have any of the older editions, it’s time to get this one. It has three new chapters, lots of new sections, and is completely updated. At 350+ pages, it’s chocked full of resources.

Road ID – Having your personal information on your person when out and about is important. We never know when an accident might happen. RoadID has been around for years. They now offer the popular Fix ID, and other models: Wrist ID, Ankle ID, and Shoe Pouch ID. Available at Road Id.

If you want to comment on this piece, please send me an email.

BAD FEET PHOTO

BadToes2
This month’s photo is from my files of favorite shots. It is a toe blister. If you look closely, you’ll see the skin is torn in several places. Does it look painful? It should because it’s on the bottom tip of the big toe; it receives pressure every time the foot rolls through its toe-off motion. There are several options. Injinji toe socks could have prevented this blister. The toe could have been pre-taped. Maybe the athlete did not use any lubricant on the toe.
So, how to patch the toe? I would apply a piece of Spenco 2nd Skin over the torn blister, and then run a strip of tape top to bottom and a second strip side to side.

READER FEEDBACK AND COMMENTS

Ed wrote: “I read your article about your presentation at a local REI and the problems people encounter with their feet. I’ve learned after years of running distances from 10KM to 100 milers that most if not all feet problems can be overcome by learning proper (correct) technique. When your foot lands, it should be directly under your hips. This helps prevent your foot from sliding in your shoe, which in turn stops black toe, blisters and other foot issues as well as leg and hip injuries since your legs and upper body are in perfect alignment. Another benefit of landing with your foot under your hips is that you maintain good balance, especially critical when on uneven surfaces and it lessens the total impact on your knees and the rest of your body.

Running and Walking are things we take for granted since we learned to do them on our own. WE KNOW HOW TO RUN AND WALK. Yes we do, but at the rudimentary level.

So why not take the time and effort to learn correct running and walking techniques and skills? It pays, as I have experienced, in ease and longevity. When it is fun and easy, you do it more.

By the way, I do teach running, pedaling and swimming technique. I’m not an exceptionally fast runner. My PR for the marathon was when I was 43 (3 hours 4 minutes). I came close to that PR when I was 50 (3 hours 6 minutes). When I was 55 I attended a running clinic that taught technique. That was four years ago and since learning good running technique my fitness world has gone up a few notches. So it’s never to late to learn.

Good technique is the foundation to great performance and longevity in any sport is the key. The only thing you’ll lose by learning good technique is the pain from the result of poor technique and maybe some of your competition.

Keep up the good work with your “Fixing Your FeetEzine”. I enjoy reading your articles. Fortunately I no longer need to employ your fixes on my feet.”

Reader feedback to this E-zine and its articles is welcome and encouraged. Please email any foot care ideas or tips that you have tried and would like to share with others, or ideas for an article for the ezine.

WRITE AN AMAZON REVIEW FOR A FREE COPY OF HAPPY FEET

Those of you with the 4th edition can get a free copy of my booklet, Happy Feet: Foot Care Advice for Walkers and Travelers. Click on Amazon or Barnes & Noble to go to the book’s page—and write a review of the 4th edition. Then send me an email telling me which site the review is on and your snail mail address. I will mail you a free copy of this 36-page booklet. Use it yourself, or give it to someone else. The booklet is described below and has a $5.00 value. Sorry, but because of postage, this offer is good only in the U.S and Canada.

MY HAPPY FEET BLOG

If you like to stay informed about foot care issues and information – on a more regular basis than this monthly newsletter, check out my blog, Happy Feet: Expert Foot Care Advice for People Who Love Their Feet. This is different from this ezine. The Happy Feet blog will have a new short topic every week. Click here for the Happy Feet blog.

GOT A STORY TO SHARE?

I am always on the look out for stories to share about their adventures with some type of connection to feet. If you have something to share, please send me an email.

PRIVACY INFORMATION

You are subscribed to the Fixing Your Feet E-zine because you subscribed to it. If you wish to be removed from this mailing list, you can find instructions at the end of this email. We respect the privacy of all subscribers and will not disclose your email address or any information about you to any third party.

SHARE THIS ISSUE

If you like this E-zine, please pass it along to others whom you think will benefit from its contents and encourage them to subscribe. They can subscribe the box at the top of this blog or with an email to Yahoo.

TO UNSUBSCRIBE

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CONTACT INFORMATION

You are welcome to contact me by email about this E-zine or the book Fixing Your Feet.

Working Your Toenails

November 19, 2008 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Footcare, Footwear, Health, Sports, Travel 

I meet too many athletes who
believe losing toenails after an event is normal. Many athletes are simply
prone to black toenails.

The
best means of preventing black toenails is to wear shoes with a generous toebox
and the proper length for your feet. Some athletes cut slits in their shoe’s
toebox or cut out a portion of the BadToes1
toebox to gain relief. Some put a strip of
moleskin or other tape on the nail, extending it a bit over the nail’s edge.

Ultrarunner
Nancy Shura advises on how she has resolved blood blisters under toenails:
“Beginning about 3-months before the big race, I use an emery board to file down
the thickness of the nails (I do all 10). You just sand the entire toenail
surface… slowly. I perform this as a nightly ritual! This should be done
gradually and gently, taking several weeks to get the entire nail paper thin!
As new nail grows out, just sand it down. I also gently file over the end of
each nail to take off any new growth. I came upon this idea based on the fact
that several runners have had their toenails surgically removed. The thinner
the nail bed, the more pliable it is to pressure. The end result is that my
toes feel nail-less to the touch. I stop sanding about three days before the
event just to be sure the nail is not tender. As the nails get thinner, at
first they can be a little tender (just like immediately after losing a nail)
but the sensation soon diminishes.”

Stop
thinking losing one’s toenails is normal and expected. Make sure your shoes fit
well, and manage your toenails.

Cold Weather and Happy Feet

November 12, 2008 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Footcare, Footwear, Health, Sports, Travel 

This past weekend I had the
opportunity to help at the Gold Rush Adventure Race in Northern California. While
the weather was great to start, over the day and evening, and into the night,
rain and cold came in. Everyone was wet and certainly the racers were cold in
addition to being fully soaked.

            It
is easy to think when we are cold to simply add layers, or thicker materials.
In many cases, this works. But we have to be careful when this thought is
applied to our feet.

            Athletes
need to understand that when we have our feet in socks and then inside shoes,
there has to be some space. Call it air space, extra space, wiggle room,
whatever you want – it’s necessary for good circulation.

            Adding
another layer of sock, or going to a thicker sock, may make the fit of the foot
in the shoe too tight. Socks that are too tight in your shoes can cause vascular
constriction. The circulation of your blood is compromised. This can lead to
even colder feet, and in extreme conditions or for extended periods of time,
can cause cellular damage.

            Do
yourself a favor. As winter's cold draws closer, be careful not to compromise
the circulation of your feet with the wrong socks. Your feet will thank you.

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