Sometimes Your Feet Quit

September 30, 2012 by
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Sports 

In August I worked the Gold Rush Adventure Race in the California Sierras. Throughout the race I worked at three checkpoints. As racers needed foot care, I carried my lounge chair and foot care box to where their team was set up and did what I could.

Most racers had hot spots, blisters and sore feet. A lot of times, athletes tell me that have blisters and yet, after cleaning their feet, none are visible. They may have a very sore spot or a hot spot, but there is no blister. Sometimes I can tape over the area or place a Spenco patch to provide a bit of cushioning. I often add an Engo Blister Prevention Patch to their insole underneath the tender area on their foot.

A lot of the racers needed blister care and taping. My whole aim when patching feet is to get the racers back in the race. I do what I can to drain and patch blisters on any part of the foot.

One of the racers came into checkpoint where they were transitioning from bikes to foot. At this point, they had been on their feet for almost two days. They started with a long paddle, followed with a long bushwack up a canyon, and then a really long bike section. The team was near the end of pack. The four members sat and discussed their options and whether to continue. The next section was a long trek of about 36 miles.

The racer needing foot care took off his shoes. As he sat back in my lounge chair, I removed his socks. His heels were fine, however he had major problems with blisters at the ball of the foot where the toes started. Both feet were the same. I cleaned his feet and did an evaluation.

I wish I had taken a few pictures of his feet but I was too involved in getting his feet patched so the team could continue. At the base of each toe were blisters. Many extended to several toes. Some of the blisters extended up between the toes. The majority had blood in the fluid. There were blisters at the base of the toes from one side of the foot to the other side – on both feet. His feet were swollen so the blistered skin was stretched tight from the fluid. In addition, several of the toes had blisters on the bottoms or sides, several with blood inside.

The blood in the blisters was my major concern and that there were so many of them. I usually drain blood blisters and with clean skin and a dab of antibiotic ointment – in a 24-hour race, I’m comfortable doing that. I always ask the person if they are up to date with their Tetanus shots and give them instructions about infections.

I talked to the racer and gave him my honest opinion – that he not continue in the race. We talked and I gave him my reasons. The next section was about 36 hard miles of cross-country trekking. His feet would get wet, and this would soften the skin and lead to further skin breakdown. The blisters were in a hard area to patch and it would especially be one long patch at the base of all his toes. The swollen condition of his feet was not going to get any better. And most important, the blood in so many blisters, even with the blisters lanced and patch, would increase the chances of an infection. Plus, if his feet took a beating during the trek, the blisters would become a huge open unpatchable mess (for lack of a better term). And of course, his feet would hurt badly.

He took my advice and I wrapped his feet as shown in the photo.

Wrapped feet with blisters all the way across the base of the toes

Wrapped feet with blisters all the way across the base of the toes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think I can count on my fingers how many times I have advised racers to stop because of foot problems. Sometimes your feet simply quit. They have had enough.

Could this have been prevented? Based on my experience, I have to say, probably. Changing socks, treating hot spots, earlier blister care, better socks, moisture controlling lubricants, airing feet at checkpoints, and better shoe fit. In a team event, such as adventure races, every member of the team must help the other members with foot care. Every team member must be honest with their teammates about the condition of their feet. In solo races where athletes are racing alone, they need to be constantly aware of their feet. And where there are crews, these important people must ask questions about the condition of the athlete’s feet.

There are no guarantees in a race of any length. Our feet propel us forward, but every so often, out feet quit.

Be Sociable, Share!

Comments

  • Ian Hoag

    John,

    Great article. My friend, Kim Duncan, recommended your website before we embarked on Primal Quest 2009, and I re-read it before doing the Patagonian Expedition Race, this year. Thanks to your site, I was able to treat blisters early-on, and have them heal, even while continuing to trek for days with soaking wet feet.

    Thanks,
    Ian Hoag

  • http://e21usa.com Shane

    I had to laugh when I read the title of this post! My feet have quit on me. My thing is endurance triathlon (Ironman and half-ironman mostly), and I am sitting here surfing the web instead of prepping for a race I was supposed to do this weekend.

    I seem to have all sorts of tendenitis going on, so I’m sidelined for awhile.

    anyway, I just wanted to say thanks for putting a smile on my face. I’m a little frustrated for something so seemingly silly to keep me out of racing! But, you said it. Sometimes your feet quit.

    Shane