Maceration is a Huge Problem

February 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 

Maceration is not limited to runners, adventure racers, and hikers. The other day Deb shared a link on an online forum, which featured some awful looking feet. Actually, truth be told, she called them “fun feet photos.”

Badly macerated feet

Badly macerated feet

I’ve seen feet like these many times over, at many races. Most recently, last October, most of the runners in the Jungle Marathon Amazon had feet like these.

You can read my post about the Amazon race here.

In the link shared by Deb, there are 14 photos of cyclist’s feet – featuring the bottoms of their feet, along with their face. The images were taken immediately after the race ended. The Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen says in the piece, “You start in Trondheim in the north, then you go up the mountains and you meet snow, rain, heavy wind, and then you finish in Oslo in the south.” He’s talking about the bicycle race in Norway, which is 336 miles long.

Rasmussen wanted to capture the pain and the hardness these people went through.

Macerated feet with tape

Macerated feet with tape

As you look at each of the 14 pairs of feet, you’ll see maceration is the common thread. Maybe one or two pair has blisters – but these are simply feet that have been wet for hours and hours, encased in wet socks and shoes.

I have captured two of the images on this page and hope you will check out the full story in the link below. It is worth looking at these images and realizing that the same thing can happen to you. You’ll also see the faces behind the feet. It’s a great visual story.

So the question is what could have been done to prevent or minimize the effects of the moisture. For this type of event, it’s hard to say how often the riders stopped, how often they changed their shoes and socks, or what they might have done to their feet. Unlike runners, who know their feet take a beating, cyclists may not realize the outcome of moisture on their feet and therefore may not take proper precautions.

In the past months, I have reviewed several products that could have helped, and in a week or so will review another new product. Here are the two links to the blog posts:

For a longer informative piece on maceration, check out my blog post in June 2011 called Maceration.

CNN World writer Kyle Almond wrote the story. To read the full story and photos click on this link, Extreme Races, These Feet Don’t Lie.

I also plan to write a blog post about many of these lubricants and how to chose the ones right for your feet. I’d look for that in late March.

 

Patching Heel Counter Wear in Shoes

Holes in Heel Counter

Holes in Heel Counter

Occasionally I see runner’s shoes that have wear holes in the material in the heel counter. This picture from Dan shows his shoes with holes to the outside of center on both heels. I emailed the following suggestion.

ENGO Back of the Heel Patch

ENGO Back of the Heel Patch

I’d try an ENGO Back of Heel Patch. They are made to shape to the curve of the back of the heel counter. Put them in when the shoe is dry. Rub them a bit in a curving motion to help them form to the shape of the shoe. Then peel off the paper backing and apply from the center outwards to the sides. Rub well so they adhere to the shoe’s material. You could also try the large ovals if the hole is small. The blue ENGO patches are very slick and can take a lot of wear. Once the blue wears down to expose white, replace the patch. Sometimes the holes are on the sides of the heel.

Heel Patch in Shoe

Heel Patch in Shoe

Heel Bump

Heel Bump

Last summer at Western States, I had a runner whose shoe was rubbing her heel raw. You can see from the image that she has a prominent heel bump. This, of course, contributed to her problem. This is the kind of problem one needs to plan for before it becomes a major issue – especially at the event the magnitude of Western States.

Cut Shoe Heel

Cut Shoe Heel

We decided to cut a notch out of the outside of her shoe’s heel. This allowed the back of the shoe to spread apart for her large heel bump. Then I applied an ENGO Back of the Heel Patch to the inside of the shoe’s heel counter. This provided some protection to her heel bump.

The large ENGO ovals can also be used when there is a small area to be covered.

I have been a fan of ENGO Blister Prevention Patches since I first discovered them years ago. The ovals are perfect for the common areas at the side of the heel where blisters form at the junction of insole and heel counter. The large rectangles are great to put on insoles underneath the ball of the foot, another common problem area.

Check out the ENGO website for more information. ENGO products are available through Zombierunner. If you are in Australia or New Zealand, ENGO products are available through Rebecca Rushton’s Blister Prevention website.

Disclosure: Tamarack Habilitation Technologies supplies me with ENGO Patches as I need them for races.

Foot Kinetics New Blister Prevention Creams

February 3, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 
Foot Kinetics

Foot Kinetics

Foot Kinetics recently introduced several new products designed to reduce blister formation. Carl and Rick, founders of Foot Kinetics, developed HikeGoo, RunGoo, WalkGoo, and SilkStep foot creams for preventing blisters and providing moisturization. The products help avoid foot problems by forming a friction-free layer between the skin and sock. This protective layer reduces rubbing and friction, working on a variety of foot problems including blisters, callus formation, soft tissue bruising, and sore feet. Each formulation is different and contains a balance of hard wax, lanolin, and natural vegetable waxes to moisturize and protect feet from abrasion and foot fatigue.

The protective foot creams are formulated for specific activities and footwear. The relative percentage of hard versus soft waxes in each product’s formulation enables it to perform optimally for that activity. The more hard wax in the formulation, the longer the product stays on the skin’s surface and the slower it absorbs. HikeGoo has the hardest wax and will last in the harsh environment of a boot on an all-day climb. RunGoo has the hard wax persistence of HikeGoo but also some added soft wax moisturization. The higher percentage of soft waxes in the foot cream, the greater the absorption and dry skin moisturization. SilkStep has the softest waxes and is optimized for moisturization.

Rather than repelling moisture or attempting to block sweat, the unique formulations actually absorb sweat and moisture to become even more effective in reducing friction between the skin and sock. This is why Foot Kinetics say they are highly effective in both dry and wet conditions to protect feet from blisters, callus formation, and skin damage.

Why it works

How the Goo Works

How the Goo Works

According to the folks at Foot Kinetics,“Our barrier creams stick around much longer than any other blister prevention or anti-chafe product on the market. They contain a high percentage of specialty hard waxes that are blended into the emulsion and make it persistent…. make it stick around all day to provide a protective layer that reduces rubbing, friction, calluses and blisters. Most other anti-chafe and blister prevention products are dimethicone-based. They are OK for thighs and chest but are too thin to stand up in the harsh environment of a shoe and you can’t apply enough to last all day.” Click on the image above for a larger view.

RunGoo

RunGoo

Foot Kinetics put a high concentration of hard wax in the HikeGoo, RunGoo, and WalkGoo emulsions and then figured out how to adjust the ‘rheology’ (deformation and flow) of the product so that it can flow out of a tube. They point out no one else has been able to do this.

They point out the other key to the success of their Goo products is their ability to last over an entire day because of the balance of lanolin alcohol in the emulsion. The balance allows it to absorb water or excess sweat and makes the emulsion ‘slipperier’. Moisture, usually present between the skin and sock, contributes to blister formation, and the lanolin alcohol balance make the skin slipperier to help keep blisters from forming.

RunGoo Protective Foot Cream prevents blisters by providing a friction barrier between the skin and sock. RunGoo contains lanolin and a balance of both soft and hard waxes to create a foot care cream that protects feet from skin damage. It is effective in eliminating blisters and calluses in traditional, barefoot style running shoes, and hiking boots. RunGoo is available in 5.5 and 3-ounce tubes.

HikeGoo

HikeGoo

HikeGoo Protective Foot Cream is very similar to RunGoo and provides a friction barrier between the skin and sock that protects feet from blisters, nerve abrasion and foot fatigue all day. High melting point waxes slow its skin absorption to create a protective layer that stays on the skin’s surface and is highly effective in helping prevent blisters. HikeGoo absorbs completely by days end and socks easily wash clean. HikeGoo is available in 5.5 and 3-ounce tubes.

WalkGoo Protective Foot Cream is a thinner compound and is good for feet because it protects and moisturizes during sport walks or while on the job. WalkGoo’s friction-free formulation reduces rubbing by including Jojoba, Mimosa, and Sunflower waxes which stay on the skins surface longer to help prevent blisters, calluses and nerve abrasion while softening and smoothing cracked heels and rejuvenating dry feet. A single application lasts all day and absorbs cleanly. WalkGoo is available in 8 and 3-ounce tubes.

SilkStep Protective Foot Cream has the highest percentage of Jojoba, Mimosa and Sunflower waxes of all their protective foot creams. It absorbs slowly providing a protective layer on the skin.

You can find all their products at the Foot Kinetics website.

The Goo products all have the same basic compound, but the amount of hard and soft waxes as well as hydration varies in each formula. Some are thicker than others and will stay on the foot for longer periods of time.

The Foot Kinetics Goo products are advertised as lasting, “…for the entire race, workout, run or game.” You need to determine if that works for your event. There’s a big difference between a 12-mile hike, a marathon, a 100-mile run and a 24-hour run. Try the Goo to see how it holds up on your skin during your events, reapplying it if necessary. If using it in events with sand and grit, cleaning the foot and then reapplication will probably be necessary.

Applying the Goo

To apply, with one or both hands, squeeze the tube firmly to get the cream started out the hole. You may have to squeeze hard, especially if in cold weather. After this initial squeeze the cream will come out more easily. Continue squeezing the tube while rubbing the applicator over your foot taking care to thickly cover problem areas such as heels, bunions, toes and the soles of your feet. Don’t worry if the coverage is uneven or lumpy. This is normal. Starting at your toes with your sock mostly inside-out, roll or pull your sock on and up over your heel. Don’t drag your sock on as this could wipe away some cream leaving exposed areas. If you are going to be engaged in your activity for a long time (i.e. hours), a thicker layer provides optimum protection.

Foot Kinetics protective foot creams are to be used only on closed healthy skin and not open wounds.

The Foot Kinetics website has a testimonials page describing how athletes have used the their products.

I used HikeGoo on several occasions. The compound is thick. Getting the initial squeeze out of the tube is challenging, as they describe. The design of the applicator gives you a generous amount of the Goo to spread on your feet. That’s how the Goo is meant to be used. If you are used to rubbing a small smear of BodyGlide or other lubricant on your skin, You’ll have to get used to the Goo. The hard waxes keep it thick and that’s how you should use it. Many lubricants go on and you have a hard time knowing they are there. When applied properly, you’ll feel the Goo, and know it’s working.

The Goo reminds me of Desitin Ointment – the stuff used on baby bottoms. The consistency in thickness is almost the same. It’s white so you see exactly where you have applied it and how much is on your skin. I like that aspect of the Goo.

I also like the two sizes of tubes; making it easy to carry a small tube in a pack, while keeping the larger tube in your foot care kit.

There’s always room on the shelves for more lubricants. This is one you’ll want to try. When I try products, I often use one on one foot and another (or nothing) on the other foot. I feel that gives me the best opportunity to fairly test the products. I’ve done that with shoes and socks too.

Give RunGoo or HikeGoo a test. See how the formula works for you. Use your regular lubricant on one foot and the Goo on the other. Then do a long run or hike, and see which your feet like the best. They can be ordered from the Foot Kinetics website and from Amazon.

Disclosure: I was supplied several samples of the Goo products to test. RunGoo, HikeGoo, WalkGoo and SilkStep are trademarked names of Foot Kinetics.

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