Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights

January 22, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Footwear Products, Health 

If you run in the dark, whether roads or trails, the Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights might be perfect for you. The lights are designed by athletes.

Night Runner 270

Night Runner 270 Shoe Lights

The lights attach to the shoelaces with multi-position adjustable brackets and weigh only 1.5 ounces. The lights give off a combined total of 150 lumens to light up the road, sidewalk, or trail in front of you. With white LEDs pointing forward and a red LED on the outside facing backwards, you are covered with 270 degrees of visibility – and you get 30+ meters in beam distance. The units are made with high-impact water-resistant casings for durability. The lights are powered by rechargeable Li-ion batteries with 4-8 hours of battery light. A supplied micro-port USB cable with a Y connection charges both units at the same time. A pair of lights sells for $59.95 and a two pair set for $109.95.

The Night Runner 270 Kit

The Night Runner 270 Kit

If you have carried hand-held lights or a headlamp, the Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights are worth considering. They could also be used for cycling. The Night Runner lights started as a Kickstarter project.

 

Two New High Technology Shoes

January 16, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Footwear, Health, Sports 

This past week I read about two new high technology running shoes. They are very different from what we have seen in the past. The shoes show how far researchers and athletic industry innovators are going in the search to find the perfect running shoe. When I first started running, in the late 80’s, there were about nine shoe companies. Today there are more than 30 and the list is growing.

I’d be willing to try both of these shows – given the opportunity. They peak my interest. We need to be open minded about new shoes coming into the shoe marketplace, because we all remember what people first thought about the Vibram Five-Finger shoes, the minimalist shoes, the maximum cushioned Hokas, and more.

The Enko Running Shoe

Enko Running Shoe

Enko Running Shoe

The first shoe I saw was simply called Enko Running. It comes in five colors. You select your size and a body weight range. It is the most futuristic shoe I have seen in years. You can see the shoe in the image. The forefoot is fixed while the back heel and mid-foot parts of the shoe are controlled by a platform with springs running from mid-shoe to under the heel. The “studs” in the outersole are replaceable. The springs act as shock absorbers, and are delivered to you based on your weight. Enko claims impact is deadened, your stride is smooth and their system conserves all the energy stored in each stride. The springs are interchangeable.

The mechanics of the Enko Running shoe

The mechanics of the Enko Running shoe

The Enko Running shoe won a CES Innovation Award in 2016. The shoe is in a fundraising campaign at IndiGoGo.com where you can fund a pair for $330, $60 off the advertised price on their website. They are 153% funded.

The Ampla Fly Running Shoe

The second shoe I saw was the Ampla Fly from AmplaSport.com. Ampla is founded by a “world-renowned sports scientist and athletic industry innovators.” Dr. Marcus Elliott has trained elite athletes through his P3 Sports Science Institute in California.

Ampla Fly Running Shoe

Ampla Fly Running Shoe

The Ampla Fly shoe is unique with its split outersole, as you can see in the image. It claims to “… empower the efficient use of force. Encourage better mechanics, which provides a platform to help you run faster, run farther…” Their carbon fiber powerforce plate “… glides the foot to a better ground contact position, gather force at mid-stance, and maximizes force application at big toe push-off.” Two videos on the website shows the technology in action. My guess is that the split outersole, with the gap in the forefoot mid-foot, acts as a flex point with the carbon fiber powerforce plate. The shoes come in two colors, in both men’s and women’s sizes. The advertised price is $180.

Design specifics of the Ampla Fly

Design specifics of the Ampla Fly

What do you think about these two new shoe? Does the design intrigue you enough to plunk down your cold hard cash?

Making Overlapping Toe Separators – Part 2

This second version of a toe separator is a more complicated to make and apply. It uses a large or small ENGO oval, depending on the size of the toes. The idea is to pinch the patch into an upside down T where the base of the T goes between the two problem toes. The patch is stuck to your insole in a position where it keeps the two toes apart. The slippery surface of the ENGO patch will prevent rubbing and the upward base of the upside down T will keep one toe from going under the other toe.

Toe separator #2 on an insole

Toe separator #2 on an insole

How to Make Your Own Toe Separator # 2

Using a utility knife, score two cuts, about one inch apart on the backside of the patch. Make them only deep enough to cut through the paper backing – do not cut through the patch itself. Try to have the one-inch wide space in the middle of the patch. Make the width of the cuts wide enough so the folded separator will be tall enough to match the height of the toes it will go between. This is important – a separator used between middle toes will have to be taller than ones used for pinky toes. Men’s toes may also require taller separators. Using the tip of the knife, remove the one-inch strip. Fold the patch in half so the sticky sides match to each other. The two end of the cut backing should meet in the middle. You can now open the two ends and cut the patch into the needed shape based on where the patch will go on the insole and the length of your toes.

Separator # 2 Height and Length

Toe separator between toes with Injinji socks

Toe separator between toes with Injinji socks

Separators for pinky toes need to be shorter in height and length than ones for the middle toes. You may have to make more than one separator based on the size you need to find the right fit.

How to Use the Separator # 2

To use the separator in your shoe, remove the insole for the foot with the overlapping toes. The smoother the insole the better the patch will stick. Clean the surface of the insole of all lint, dust or other things that could interfere with the patch adhering. Make sure the insoles are dry. Put the insole on the floor and stand on it so your foot falls into any indentations. Usually, an insole will have indentations under the heel, ball of the foot, and some of the toes. Using a pen, make a mark between the two affected toes. Put on a pair of Injinji socks and make sure the marking is still in the right place.

Once the placement has been confirmed, with sock on, place the separator between the two toes to make sure it fits. The best way to do this is with your foot on the insole. The height should come up to the top of the toes with sock on. If the height is too high, trim it with a scissors. If it’s too low, make another separator where the pinched section is higher.

Toe separator between 2nd and 3rd toes with Injinji socks

Toe separator between 2nd and 3rd toes with Injinji socks

The length needs to be long enough to cover the body of the toe – without hitting the crease between the toes. If the separator touches the crease, it could rub and cause problems, especially if the foot moves forward in the shoe. If it’s too long, trim it with a scissors.

Once the fit has been checked, you can place the separator on the insole. Line it up so the upward part is in the correct place. Then remove the protective backing to expose the adhesive and place the patch on the insole with the upward part over the line on the insole. Rub the separator to make sure it is firmly secured to the insole. Use a scissors to trim any part that extends over the sides of the insole. Use a blow dryer for a few

If the patch does not stick, you probably have an insole with a surface that is not smooth enough or too soft with too much fabric that does not allow the adhesive to hold. In this case, you may want to try another insole with a better surface. They can be peeled off the insole if they are placed wrong, but will probably not stick as well if you try to reattach them. The patches will not stick to a wet insole. For easier removal, use a blow dryer or heat gun to heat the patch.

If the Separator # 2 is Too Weak

It’s possible that the pinched section of the ENGO patch will be too weak or thin to keep the toe from going under the next toe. If you can tell the toe is going under, here’s an idea to make it stronger. Take another ENGO Patch and cut a strip the width of the top of the separator, remove the adhesive backing, and pinch it over the existing separator so it reinforces the upward part of the separator and extends onto the base. This will strengthen the part between the toes and make it stiffer and better able to keep one toe from going under the other.

Sources

Injinji socks and ENGO patches can be purchased at Zombierunner.com. The patches can also be purchased at the ENGO website. Disclosure: I have an affiliate relationship with Zombierunner.

Making Overlapping Toe Separators – Part 1

January 3, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Footwear, Health 

This is part one of a two-part blog post.

Over the past few years, I have seen many athletes with a common toe problem – overlapping toes. Some people may call then underlapping toes or call them some other name. When a pinky toe goes under the 4th toe, both toes can be negatively affected. Skin is pinched. Hot spots and then blisters form. Often callus develops as the skin is constantly under pressure from the overlapping toe.

While most common to the 4th toe and pinky toe, overlapping toes can affect any two toes. This is not necessarily a problem limited to running shoes or hiking footwear. It can happen in everyday footwear too. The cause of over-lapping is unknown. Many experts suspect that they are caused by an imbalance in the small muscles of the foot.

There are some easy solutions, which may or may not help, because toes are different. You can switch to Injinji toe socks, giving each toe it’s own little sock and some degree of protection. You can cut out a portion of the insole under the toe that goes under the other toe, giving the toe some extra space. Another option is to tape around the toe or toes to give some protection too.

This is an idea to help runners, adventure racers, and hikers with the problem of overlapping toes. You will need Injinji toe socks, ENGO Blister Prevention Patches (large ovals), and removable insoles. There are two types of separators you can make. This post will cover the first of the two.

Toe Separator Number 1

I use an ENGO Blister Prevention Patch as the toe separators. They make a small and large oval, but I like the large because of its size.

The first toe separator is easy to make and use – and it uses one large ENGO patch. Take a scissors and cut a long oval into a strip, about ¾ inch wide and 1¾ inches long. If you are cutting this for a middle toe or for large toes, it may have to be 1 to 1 ¼ inches wide and a bit longer. Round all corners. Cut one of the remaining sections into a small strip, ¼ inch wide and 1¼ inch long. Take the large oval and remove half the backing from one end. Wearing Injinji socks, put the large oval between the two affected toes. Put the end of the large oval with the exposed adhesive over the toe next to the toe that goes under it. The blue side will go from the top of one toe, run between the toes, and under the toe that normally goes under the other one. What you have is an S shaped patch from the top of one toe, between them, and then under the next toe. Take the small strip and remove the backing, and put one end of the adhesive on the white backing that is underneath the toe at the bottom of the S. The other end of the strip can be stuck onto the top of that toes sock. The small strip is needed to hold the bottom of the S under the toe when you put your foot in your shoe. The S shaped patch will keep the toes apart. Obviously, these are single use. If the patch seems too weak, use two strips to make the S patch stronger.

Toe Separator #1 - top view

Toe Separator #1 – top view

Toe Separator # 1 - bottom view

Toe Separator # 1 – bottom view

Injinji socks and Engo patches can be purchased at Zombierunner.com. The patches can also be purchased at the Engo website.

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