The Power of ENGO

December 5, 2017 by
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Footcare, Footwear 

Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, a company dedicated to the prevention and relief of skin breakdown for individuals with prosthetic limbs and orthopedic braces, created ENGO Blister Prevention Patches in 2004. The patches are designed to prevent blisters and reduce pain from existing blisters. These patches are one of the best products to help athletes that have been released in many years. I think two or three of these thin ENGO Patches patches should be in everyone’s foot care kit.

ENGO Heel Patches

ENGO Heel Patches

ENGO low-friction patches are applied to your shoe, insole, or orthotic—not your skin. The patches are made with three layers: a low friction outer surface made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a fabric backing, and an adhesive. Patches range from small and large ovals to a large rectangle to a shaped strip for heels—and each can be cut to size. These thin patches can greatly reduce friction in targeted locations within your footwear by giving a slick, slippery surface to the area of your footwear or insole where friction is a problem. Socks slide over the patch, reducing the usual drag, which allows the foot’s skin and the sock to glide with the underneath bone through the foot strike, reducing shear distortions in that area.

ENGO offers multiple advantages over other blister prevention and treatment products:

  • Reduction in friction levels
  • Targeted protection at the specific problem area to reduce friction
  • Durable and can last for months
  • Cost-effective based on their small size and durability
  • Well tolerated because it is placed on and in footwear
  • Takes up virtually no space so it doesn’t change the fit of the shoe
ENGO side of the foot patch

ENGO side of the foot patch

ENGO patches can work in footwear to reduce shear, prevent blisters, and provide relief almost anywhere on the foot: the bottom and sides of the heel, ball of the foot, side of the foot, and arch areas. Patches should be applied to dry and clean footwear, which makes them perfect for proactive prevention. Sometimes when shoes are wet, patches are applied to dry socks. The patches have many uses, including on bike seats, paddles, tool handles, and more.

ENGO rectangle patches in a package

ENGO rectangle patches in a package

Types of ENGO Patches

ENGO patches come in small and large ovals, back of the heel patches, and rectangles. A good rule of thumb is to select a patch that is slightly larger than troubled area or blister. Select the patch that is right for you, based on the area where you have a blister:

  • Heel: ENGO Back of Heel Patches
  • Arch: ENGO Large Oval Patches
  • Ball of foot: ENGO Oval or rectangle
  • Side of foot: ENGO Large Oval Patches
  • Toes: ENGO Small Ovals
  • Skates, Helmets, Boots: ENGO Rectangle Blister Patches
  • Multiple Blisters: ENGO Blister Prevention Patch Variety Pack

Using ENGO Patches

  • Remove half of the patch from the backing, using the backing to create a tab. Use tab for handling patch.
  • Apply adhesive side of ENGO patch to desired location of clean, dry footwear.
    Tip: ENGO may last longer when anchored to a surface. For example, wrapping patches around the edge/sides of the insole.
  • Peel remaining backing away from patch.
  • If blisters form at interface of footwear & insole, use two patches. One patch is placed on the footwear. The other patch is placed on the insole. A smooth interface is created.
  • Press firmly around entire patch surface to secure.
  • To protect remaining patched and preserve their quality, store your unused patches in the re-closable, heavy duty ENGO bag that they came in.

Tamarack is always developing new products, for instance, a thin lowfriction tape that could be useful for athletes and special socks with a low friction forefoot. The best way to connect with Tamarack is through the ENGO website, goengo.com.

Note: ENGO patches need to be applied to dry shoes.

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Comments

One Comment on The Power of ENGO

  1. Ralph Alcorn on Tue, 5th Dec 2017 11:28 pm
  2. I’ve used some of these and am a firm belliever.
    P.S. on the boxes after Submit Comment, why the two different forms of notify me of followup comments?

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