All About Insoles

August 30, 2014 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Footwear, Health, Sports 

 

Insoles and Beyond

Insoles and Beyond is a family-owned small business based in North Carolina. They want to help you be comfortable, avoid injury, and reduce any pain you are experiencing. Their insole line includes a wide variety of insoles from manufacturers including, Birkenstock, currexSole, New Balance, Powerstep, Sof Sole, and Sole. Whether you are looking for orthotics for plantar fasciitis pain, arch support inserts for comfort, or insoles for running shoes and other sports performance, you can find them at Insoles and Beyond. Within each company’s line are a variety of insoles and sizes. You can look for insoles by company name, foot type, activity, pain/condition, and shoe type. They also carry compression wear from CEP compression and Mediven, and offer ankle braces, knee braces and splints as well. 

Because many athletes don’t understand insoles, I asked Stacey some questions about insoles. I think the questions will help you when you need insoles, or if you are unsure why you should replace the standard “sock liner” that came with your shoes. For years, I have told people that generally speaking, the stock sock liners shipped in shoes offer little support and are of little help. Many are simply thin pieces of foam or cardboard. Read on to learn about insoles. Then check out Insoles and Beyond’s website.

I’ve run for years and always used the regular insoles that come with shoes. Why should I consider a replacement pair of insoles? Most running shoes (expensive and inexpensive alike) use very simple and cheap foam insoles despite the tons of science that goes into making the rest of the shoe.  Many runners will spend $100 to $200 on a pair of running shoes based on the materials and technology used to make them but then leave in the relatively generic insoles that come with the shoes.  It makes sense that shoe manufacturers don’t invest much in the insoles – everyone’s foot is different. Shoe manufactures leave it to the consumer to purchase the appropriate insoles for their specific foot needs – high arches, low arches, overpronation, etc. Additionally, some people want more cushioning than others. Some want more support than others. Personally, the first thing I do when I buy a pair of shoes is rip out the “sock liner” and put in a pair of my favorite insoles.

currexSole Insoles

currexSole Insoles

There’s a whole bunch of replacement insoles to choose from, how can I make an intelligent choice? Our website has some good information on the various types of insoles and categories (collections) to help you find the insole that is appropriate for you. So, that’s a good starting place. However, within the categories (insoles for plantar fasciitis, insoles for running, insoles for hiking, etc.) there may still be questions. At that point, I’d suggest calling us or sending us an email to discuss things further.

Are certain insoles better than others for minimalist shoes and zero-drop shoes? Absolutely. Lower profile/volume insoles are best for minimalist shoes. Sole’s ThinSport and currexSole’s RunPros are both low volume options. The ThinSport has the same arch support as Sole’s Response and Ultra, but with less cushioning. The currexSole RunPros pack a lot of cushioning and less arch support (allowing for a more natural feel). Most insoles are neutral in terms of drop – they can be worn in zero-drop shoes.

How long do these insoles last? That depends. Many manufacturers recommend that you replace the insoles as often as you replace your shoes. Generally most running shoes should be replaced at 500 miles. I find that the BirkoSport by Birkenstock last pretty long – I’ve used them through four or five shoe replacements. Sole, New Balance, and Powerstep insoles tend to last a while (3 or 4 changes). Birkenstock and Sole both mold to your feet the longer you wear them. SofSole tends to only last one or two changes, but they are also less expensive. Generally speaking the more cushioned the insoles and the more activity they are subjected to, the more frequently you’ll need to replace them.

What’s the difference between inexpensive insoles and the more expensive ones? I believe you can get a really good pair of insoles in the $25 to $65 range. Custom insoles can run hundreds of dollars and many customers who’ve had custom insoles have shared with us that the $40 insoles they got from us were just as effective as the $400 custom pair they got from their doctor. The cheap insoles ($10 to $20 insoles at the drugstore) tend to not be much better than the insoles that come in the shoes to begin with. Among the insoles we offer, the materials used and the overall durability of the insoles set inexpensive and expensive insoles apart.  I find that the more expensive the insoles, the longer they tend to last. Conversely, the less expensive insoles last a shorter period of time. Materials like carbon fiber, cork latex, tend to be more expensive and durable than gel insoles.

I cross-train and ride bikes too. Are there insoles made for biking shoes? There are definitely insoles specifically made for biking shoes. You can, however, use general purpose or running shoe insoles for biking shoes as well. The trick is to make sure that the insoles are low volume (since most biking shoes will not accommodate thick insoles) and that they have good cushioning in the ball of the foot (the part that is in contact with the bike pedal the most). Something like the currexSole RunPro can easily go from your cycling shoes to your running shoes if you are cross-training.

You may be asking why you would order insoles from Insoles and Beyond. Yes, you can find insoles in the foot care section of your local drugstore, sporting goods store, and running store. But will they be the right ones for your feet? Check out their lines of insoles and if you have questions, give them a call. On the right side of their page, is a 10% coupon and they offer free shipping in the U.S.

Disclosure: I have no financial involvement in Insoles and Beyond.

Maceration at Western States

Last weekend I worked foot care at the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run.  We had a fairly dry winter with not much snow in the high country and I had heard runners talk of the dust on the trail. Based on that, I did not expect to see high number of runner’s having foot trouble because of maceration.

Working Michigan Bluff aid station, at 55.7 miles, I was surprised by the runners coming in with wet feet, and varying degrees of maceration. For some, it was minor skin softening and maybe a few surface creases. Others had more severe maceration, with creases that were deeper over widespread areas on the bottom of their feet.  A few were really bad – deep creases and skin folding over on itself.  In extreme cases, the folded skin can split open.

While maceration is commonly caused by stream and river crossings, it also happens when runners pour water over their heads and body and it runs down into their shoes. Feet also sweat a lot, some people’s more than others, and this also can lead to maceration.

I also worked the finish line. There I saw even worst cases of maceration.

Severe maceration can manifest itself as a burning sensation, and the feeling of large blisters all over the bottom of their feet. Taking off the runner’s shoes and socks, we found virtually all of these complaints to be degrees of maceration. Two facts are evident. First, as might be expected, the longer a runner is on the course, the worse the feet can become. Secondly, not changing one’s shoes and socks during the race can magnify the effects of maceration.

The photos here are of one runner. My recollection is this runner finished the 100 miles in about 29 hours. She came into the podiatrity area of the medical tent and could barely walk. This is not uncommon. Runners dig deep and finish on adrenalin and then once they stop, the extent of the injuries to their feet hits them.

Photo 1: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 1: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 1 shows the bottom of the right foot – it’s worst than the left. You can see the white of the skin, and the creases running over much of the foot. The creases extend down to the mid-foot. Notice the white skin flap on the tip of the little toe.

 

Photo 2: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 2: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 2 is a close up if the toes. You can see the large skin flap on the little toe. This flap of skin was very white and looked as if the skin on the tip of the toes had been pulled outward and pinched. It was about ¼ inch in length. It runs from the toenail to the bottom of the toe.

 

Photo 3: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 3: Macerated Feet WS100

Photo 3 shows the side of the forefoot. You can see the large fold of skin of the inside of the ball of the foot. This can be very painful and can split open under pressure.

Unfortunately, there is no quick fix for maceration. Typical treatments include warming the feet, moisture-absorbing powder, dry socks, allowing the feet exposure to air to dry, and time. In talking to this runner, she did not change her shoes nor socks during the 100 miles. I don’t recall the type of shoe, but my guess is that it did not allow water to drain.

Athlete Applying Hipoglos

Athlete Applying Hipoglos

There are several ways to manage possible maceration. Several years ago I watched as an adventure racer coated the bottom of his feet with Hipoglos, a European version of zinc oxide. The compound helps control moisture on the skin, whether zinc oxide or Desitin or a similar product. RunGoo, Century Riding Cream, and Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream are similar products. I may have another product to announce early next month.

Another helpful tip is to make sure your shoes drain well. Whether that means mesh uppers, mesh or a draining material down to the shoes upper sole, or making drain holes with a heated nail, draining water out of the shoe is important. Then of course, changing your shoes and socks is also important. Most 100’s have aid stations with drop bags and it’s easy to put a pair of shoes in one or two drop bags, or have your crew have them ready.

Maceration can be cruel. It ruins the race for some runners. It’s painful. It can take days to heal fully.  But there are ways to minimize its effects.  If you are running a 100 or a multi-day race, and there is a chance of water on the course, plan accordingly.

Listen to me interviewed on Trail Runner Nation

A few weeks ago I was interviewed by Scott Warr and Don Freeman from Trail Runner Nation. I was honored they asked me and we had fun doing the interview. The subject? What else but feet!

Trail Runner Nation

Trail Runner Nation

You can listen to the interview on their website, download the MP3 file, or better yet, subscribe to their podcast series through iTunes. Here’s the link to their webpage: FEET – Injury Prevention and Treatment with John Vonhof.

Here’s what they wrote on their website:

One of your most important tools as a runner is your feet. You need to take care of them or your training/race may be foiled. John Vonhof literally wrote the book on how to take care of your feet: Fixing Your Feet.  This book is now in the FIFTH edition!  John joins The Nation to discuss the basic principles of foot care:

  • How you can have healthy & happy feet
  • Footwear
  • Insoles
  • Gaiters
  • Blister prevention and treatment
  • What to keep in a foot care kit
  • Taping your feet

The interview is 62 minutes in length, but my interview starts about five minutes in. Enjoy the interview and then subscribe to Trail Runner Nation’s podcast.

Thanks Scott and Don for giving me the opportunity to share a bit of my passion for feet on your podcast.

Toenail Care For Athletes

April 3, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, toenails 

Today’s post is contributed by Gwen Lewis.

Athletes are prone to a number of injuries; torn or sprained ligaments and muscles, bruises, and broken bones. More common, irritating, unsightly and often embarrassing afflictions are situations such as athletes foot and toenail and toe-bed injuries. Athletes foot is a fungal infection that affects the areas between the toes leading them to become itchy, inflamed and painful. In extreme cases, especially for extreme athletes, infection can lead to ingrown toenails and in the worst cases, loss of toenails, which can make practice unbearably painful and slow or halt performance. Read on to discover ways to protect and repair damaged and irritated feet and toenails.

From the ground up

As an athlete, the right pair of shoes makes all the difference when it comes to preventing wear and tear on hard-working feet. A pair of running shoes that are too tight will pinch nerves and lead to ingrown toenails as well as painful bunions, blisters and calluses.

Look for shoes that allow your feet to breathe (mesh, canvas or leather). Shy away from rubber and plastic, which hold moisture in and cause feet to sweat, and infections to flourish. Allow time for your shoes to dry – forgo wearing the same pair of shoes two days in a row. Many people do not realize how important the insoles of a shoe are and what benefits they can give your feet with the right pair. Wear socks made of natural fibers that absorb moisture best, or invest in synthetics that are especially designed to draw moisture away from the foot.

Athlete’s foot

Athlete's foot discomfort

Athlete’s foot discomfort

This affliction affects quite a large number of athletes. It is a fungal infection known as tinea pedis, which targets the nails and skin, causing skin to become red, cracked, burnt, scaly and itchy. Sometimes the infection stays mainly between the toes, but in extreme cases it may also appear on the soles and side of feet and spreads to the toenails. It can also be accompanied by painful, oozing blisters. Athlete’s foot is easily spread and can be picked up in common areas such as showers, and can become exacerbated by moist, tight shoes and socks.

Prevent athletes foot by keeping feet clean and dry, and wearing the right shoes and socks as we mentioned above. Avoid walking around barefoot in public areas and wear flip-flops in locker room showers and bathrooms.

Toenail care

Trimming toenails correctly

Trimming toenails correctly

Athletes are often prone to extreme cases of damaged and injured toes and toenails. These types of injuries can lead to loss of toenails, and debilitating ingrown toenails. Prevent ingrown toenails by keeping nails clean and clipped short and trimmed straight across. The medical term for toenails that fall off due to a fungal infection or traumatic injury is called onychoptosis or onycholysis, which indicate a separation of the nail from nail bed. If there is trauma to the nail, damage will be characterized by pain, bruising under the nail bed, discoloration of the nail, and ultimately loosening of the nail. If damage is caused by an infection, look out for thickening of the nail, yellow, brown or green discoloration, swelling, pain, itching, flaking, redness, foul odor and possible discharge.

Natural remedies

If you see any of these symptoms, there are ways to treat and prevent further injury or damage. Athlete’s foot can be eased by a number of natural solutions; baking soda used as a paste can ease the itch and burn between toes, and a foot soak made of baking soda and salt will soothe affected areas. Plain yogurt is also an instant remedy for athlete’s foot, simply dab on infected areas, let dry and then rinse off. Tea-tree oil is a powerful antiseptic, mixed with olive oil and rubbed on it will clean, heal and soothe dry patches. Calendula is also a powerful herbal healer that has antifungal and anti-inflammatory powers. If your toenails are ingrown or inflamed, clean them with antiseptic, gently pull up the nail and trim what part of the nail you can off. Seek treatment immediately if the area under the nail bed is extremely painful and oozing.

Gwen Lewis is a writer who lives in California. She has a passion for beauty and health and loves to write her articles from experience. She grew up playing soccer and knows the importance of taking care of your feet. She hopes you find these tips helpful to prevent any athletes from foot problems.

Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream

March 26, 2014 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health 

A while back I was sent a sample tube of Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream. It’s another entry into the marketplace of blister and chafe prevention products – needed by many athletes.

Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream

Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream

Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream is a white non-sticky and non-greasy cream that spreads evenly and leaves a protective smooth, almost silky feel to the skin. Unlike some creams or lubricants, I did not have to wash my fingers after applying it to my skin. It’s not oily. It will wash off with soap and water and will not stain your clothes.

This cream can be used by athletes, whatever their sport. It has a great following by cyclists, but is perfect for runners, walkers and hikers. Use it on your feet – between your toes and on your heels, anywhere you typically develop hot spots or blisters. If you are doing a long race or event, you might want to pack a small amount in a Ziploc bag for a second application if you feel it necessary. While it will not sweat off, if you are ding a day long race, a second application could be helpful. It can be used on underarms, inner thighs, and anywhere in your groin or backside areas. It works well on sensitive skin areas and will not burn or sting. Cyclists can also apply it directly to the chamois in their bike shorts.

Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream is available in a 3.3 oz tube and smaller single use packs. A little bit of the cream goes a long ways.

The cream contains Tree Tea Oil, which has nice healing properties. It also contain silicone, which helps with moisture and perspiration control, an important part of foot care for many athletes.

Here’s a report from a friend I asked to try the cream. “I got a chance to use Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream cycling 46 miles on Friday. Cycling was the first sport on it’s list of uses, and it says ‘Apply directly to skin on ANY areas prone to chafing’, and on cyclists that would be the whole crotch zone, which is embarrassingly where I have a problem on long rides with lots of hills. You can also apply it after an activity to calm irritated skin, so I assumed it must be for sensitive areas. It was not uncomfortable to apply, and has a pleasant herbal scent, and was effective at eliminating crotch chafe for me, even though I rode 46 miles. I had no need to apply it afterwards and it did not stain my clothing. I used it only once, but I give it a ‘Thumbs up’!”

Check out some of the testimonials on their website and you’ll find someone who is doing your sport and has had success with the cream.

I recommend trying Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream for your activity. I am a strong believer in trying products to find the best for your feet (and in this case, other body parts). I think Blue Steel Sports Anti-Chafe Cream is a winner.

I have no financial interest in Blue Steel products.

Maceration is a Huge Problem

February 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 

Maceration is not limited to runners, adventure racers, and hikers. The other day Deb shared a link on an online forum, which featured some awful looking feet. Actually, truth be told, she called them “fun feet photos.”

Badly macerated feet

Badly macerated feet

I’ve seen feet like these many times over, at many races. Most recently, last October, most of the runners in the Jungle Marathon Amazon had feet like these.

You can read my post about the Amazon race here.

In the link shared by Deb, there are 14 photos of cyclist’s feet – featuring the bottoms of their feet, along with their face. The images were taken immediately after the race ended. The Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen says in the piece, “You start in Trondheim in the north, then you go up the mountains and you meet snow, rain, heavy wind, and then you finish in Oslo in the south.” He’s talking about the bicycle race in Norway, which is 336 miles long.

Rasmussen wanted to capture the pain and the hardness these people went through.

Macerated feet with tape

Macerated feet with tape

As you look at each of the 14 pairs of feet, you’ll see maceration is the common thread. Maybe one or two pair has blisters – but these are simply feet that have been wet for hours and hours, encased in wet socks and shoes.

I have captured two of the images on this page and hope you will check out the full story in the link below. It is worth looking at these images and realizing that the same thing can happen to you. You’ll also see the faces behind the feet. It’s a great visual story.

So the question is what could have been done to prevent or minimize the effects of the moisture. For this type of event, it’s hard to say how often the riders stopped, how often they changed their shoes and socks, or what they might have done to their feet. Unlike runners, who know their feet take a beating, cyclists may not realize the outcome of moisture on their feet and therefore may not take proper precautions.

In the past months, I have reviewed several products that could have helped, and in a week or so will review another new product. Here are the two links to the blog posts:

For a longer informative piece on maceration, check out my blog post in June 2011 called Maceration.

CNN World writer Kyle Almond wrote the story. To read the full story and photos click on this link, Extreme Races, These Feet Don’t Lie.

I also plan to write a blog post about many of these lubricants and how to chose the ones right for your feet. I’d look for that in late March.

 

Patching Heel Counter Wear in Shoes

Holes in Heel Counter

Holes in Heel Counter

Occasionally I see runner’s shoes that have wear holes in the material in the heel counter. This picture from Dan shows his shoes with holes to the outside of center on both heels. I emailed the following suggestion.

ENGO Back of the Heel Patch

ENGO Back of the Heel Patch

I’d try an ENGO Back of Heel Patch. They are made to shape to the curve of the back of the heel counter. Put them in when the shoe is dry. Rub them a bit in a curving motion to help them form to the shape of the shoe. Then peel off the paper backing and apply from the center outwards to the sides. Rub well so they adhere to the shoe’s material. You could also try the large ovals if the hole is small. The blue ENGO patches are very slick and can take a lot of wear. Once the blue wears down to expose white, replace the patch. Sometimes the holes are on the sides of the heel.

Heel Patch in Shoe

Heel Patch in Shoe

Heel Bump

Heel Bump

Last summer at Western States, I had a runner whose shoe was rubbing her heel raw. You can see from the image that she has a prominent heel bump. This, of course, contributed to her problem. This is the kind of problem one needs to plan for before it becomes a major issue – especially at the event the magnitude of Western States.

Cut Shoe Heel

Cut Shoe Heel

We decided to cut a notch out of the outside of her shoe’s heel. This allowed the back of the shoe to spread apart for her large heel bump. Then I applied an ENGO Back of the Heel Patch to the inside of the shoe’s heel counter. This provided some protection to her heel bump.

The large ENGO ovals can also be used when there is a small area to be covered.

I have been a fan of ENGO Blister Prevention Patches since I first discovered them years ago. The ovals are perfect for the common areas at the side of the heel where blisters form at the junction of insole and heel counter. The large rectangles are great to put on insoles underneath the ball of the foot, another common problem area.

Check out the ENGO website for more information. ENGO products are available through Zombierunner. If you are in Australia or New Zealand, ENGO products are available through Rebecca Rushton’s Blister Prevention website.

Disclosure: Tamarack Habilitation Technologies supplies me with ENGO Patches as I need them for races.

Foot Kinetics New Blister Prevention Creams

February 3, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 
Foot Kinetics

Foot Kinetics

Foot Kinetics recently introduced several new products designed to reduce blister formation. Carl and Rick, founders of Foot Kinetics, developed HikeGoo, RunGoo, WalkGoo, and SilkStep foot creams for preventing blisters and providing moisturization. The products help avoid foot problems by forming a friction-free layer between the skin and sock. This protective layer reduces rubbing and friction, working on a variety of foot problems including blisters, callus formation, soft tissue bruising, and sore feet. Each formulation is different and contains a balance of hard wax, lanolin, and natural vegetable waxes to moisturize and protect feet from abrasion and foot fatigue.

The protective foot creams are formulated for specific activities and footwear. The relative percentage of hard versus soft waxes in each product’s formulation enables it to perform optimally for that activity. The more hard wax in the formulation, the longer the product stays on the skin’s surface and the slower it absorbs. HikeGoo has the hardest wax and will last in the harsh environment of a boot on an all-day climb. RunGoo has the hard wax persistence of HikeGoo but also some added soft wax moisturization. The higher percentage of soft waxes in the foot cream, the greater the absorption and dry skin moisturization. SilkStep has the softest waxes and is optimized for moisturization.

Rather than repelling moisture or attempting to block sweat, the unique formulations actually absorb sweat and moisture to become even more effective in reducing friction between the skin and sock. This is why Foot Kinetics say they are highly effective in both dry and wet conditions to protect feet from blisters, callus formation, and skin damage.

Why it works

How the Goo Works

How the Goo Works

According to the folks at Foot Kinetics,“Our barrier creams stick around much longer than any other blister prevention or anti-chafe product on the market. They contain a high percentage of specialty hard waxes that are blended into the emulsion and make it persistent…. make it stick around all day to provide a protective layer that reduces rubbing, friction, calluses and blisters. Most other anti-chafe and blister prevention products are dimethicone-based. They are OK for thighs and chest but are too thin to stand up in the harsh environment of a shoe and you can’t apply enough to last all day.” Click on the image above for a larger view.

RunGoo

RunGoo

Foot Kinetics put a high concentration of hard wax in the HikeGoo, RunGoo, and WalkGoo emulsions and then figured out how to adjust the ‘rheology’ (deformation and flow) of the product so that it can flow out of a tube. They point out no one else has been able to do this.

They point out the other key to the success of their Goo products is their ability to last over an entire day because of the balance of lanolin alcohol in the emulsion. The balance allows it to absorb water or excess sweat and makes the emulsion ‘slipperier’. Moisture, usually present between the skin and sock, contributes to blister formation, and the lanolin alcohol balance make the skin slipperier to help keep blisters from forming.

RunGoo Protective Foot Cream prevents blisters by providing a friction barrier between the skin and sock. RunGoo contains lanolin and a balance of both soft and hard waxes to create a foot care cream that protects feet from skin damage. It is effective in eliminating blisters and calluses in traditional, barefoot style running shoes, and hiking boots. RunGoo is available in 5.5 and 3-ounce tubes.

HikeGoo

HikeGoo

HikeGoo Protective Foot Cream is very similar to RunGoo and provides a friction barrier between the skin and sock that protects feet from blisters, nerve abrasion and foot fatigue all day. High melting point waxes slow its skin absorption to create a protective layer that stays on the skin’s surface and is highly effective in helping prevent blisters. HikeGoo absorbs completely by days end and socks easily wash clean. HikeGoo is available in 5.5 and 3-ounce tubes.

WalkGoo Protective Foot Cream is a thinner compound and is good for feet because it protects and moisturizes during sport walks or while on the job. WalkGoo’s friction-free formulation reduces rubbing by including Jojoba, Mimosa, and Sunflower waxes which stay on the skins surface longer to help prevent blisters, calluses and nerve abrasion while softening and smoothing cracked heels and rejuvenating dry feet. A single application lasts all day and absorbs cleanly. WalkGoo is available in 8 and 3-ounce tubes.

SilkStep Protective Foot Cream has the highest percentage of Jojoba, Mimosa and Sunflower waxes of all their protective foot creams. It absorbs slowly providing a protective layer on the skin.

You can find all their products at the Foot Kinetics website.

The Goo products all have the same basic compound, but the amount of hard and soft waxes as well as hydration varies in each formula. Some are thicker than others and will stay on the foot for longer periods of time.

The Foot Kinetics Goo products are advertised as lasting, “…for the entire race, workout, run or game.” You need to determine if that works for your event. There’s a big difference between a 12-mile hike, a marathon, a 100-mile run and a 24-hour run. Try the Goo to see how it holds up on your skin during your events, reapplying it if necessary. If using it in events with sand and grit, cleaning the foot and then reapplication will probably be necessary.

Applying the Goo

To apply, with one or both hands, squeeze the tube firmly to get the cream started out the hole. You may have to squeeze hard, especially if in cold weather. After this initial squeeze the cream will come out more easily. Continue squeezing the tube while rubbing the applicator over your foot taking care to thickly cover problem areas such as heels, bunions, toes and the soles of your feet. Don’t worry if the coverage is uneven or lumpy. This is normal. Starting at your toes with your sock mostly inside-out, roll or pull your sock on and up over your heel. Don’t drag your sock on as this could wipe away some cream leaving exposed areas. If you are going to be engaged in your activity for a long time (i.e. hours), a thicker layer provides optimum protection.

Foot Kinetics protective foot creams are to be used only on closed healthy skin and not open wounds.

The Foot Kinetics website has a testimonials page describing how athletes have used the their products.

I used HikeGoo on several occasions. The compound is thick. Getting the initial squeeze out of the tube is challenging, as they describe. The design of the applicator gives you a generous amount of the Goo to spread on your feet. That’s how the Goo is meant to be used. If you are used to rubbing a small smear of BodyGlide or other lubricant on your skin, You’ll have to get used to the Goo. The hard waxes keep it thick and that’s how you should use it. Many lubricants go on and you have a hard time knowing they are there. When applied properly, you’ll feel the Goo, and know it’s working.

The Goo reminds me of Desitin Ointment – the stuff used on baby bottoms. The consistency in thickness is almost the same. It’s white so you see exactly where you have applied it and how much is on your skin. I like that aspect of the Goo.

I also like the two sizes of tubes; making it easy to carry a small tube in a pack, while keeping the larger tube in your foot care kit.

There’s always room on the shelves for more lubricants. This is one you’ll want to try. When I try products, I often use one on one foot and another (or nothing) on the other foot. I feel that gives me the best opportunity to fairly test the products. I’ve done that with shoes and socks too.

Give RunGoo or HikeGoo a test. See how the formula works for you. Use your regular lubricant on one foot and the Goo on the other. Then do a long run or hike, and see which your feet like the best. They can be ordered from the Foot Kinetics website and from Amazon.

Disclosure: I was supplied several samples of the Goo products to test. RunGoo, HikeGoo, WalkGoo and SilkStep are trademarked names of Foot Kinetics.

Fixing Your Feet Saves the Day

Fixing Your Feet - 5th edition

Fixing Your Feet – 5th edition

I love reading the unsolicited email and testimonials from athletes who have discovered Fixing Your Feet. They help motivate me to keep going. Here are two. The first is a simple sentence. The second is a personal story I received last week. Thanks everyone who has passed along their story.

I’m pretty sure Fixing Your Feet has saved most of us at one point. ~ an email from Deb Bosilevac.

Then Billy Pearce (husband, father of 3 boys, nurse and ultrarunner) shared his story:

My many years of ultrarunning with a three shoe size difference in feet caused by a traumatic injury as a child has always been a challenge with shoes and blisters. So I choose ultrarunning as my passion! I have had two DNF’s in the Australian classic Coast to Kosci 240km beach to Australia’s highest peak. So this year my attempt to get a finish was one of real attention to where things had gone wrong before.

This year I had my podiatrist and friend on my crew, (Brad White, from Footcare Woden, Canberra ACT Australia). I attend his clinic monthly as routine and we have planned all year for this race. Brad is also a gifted runner.

Best footcare ever. In over 42 hours 26 minutes of running I needed two stops to attend to feet – totaling less than 15 minutes for both stops! I gave him a copy of Fixing Your Feet and I think we have created a new passion for him. 

I found your work after a 48 hour race when my feet become so bad I was reduced to painful shuffle for last 24 hours then weeks of healing. I am now able to race 24 hours on a track without a scratch and as we say, “If you do not have a plan for your feet, you do not have a race plan.” Thanks heaps for the help and advice you give so freely.

Do you have the 5th edition of Fixing Your Feet? Last summer while working on feet at the Michigan Bluff aid station of Western States, a runner’s crew member came up to ask me if I’d sign his copy of Fixing Your Feet. While I signed it, I told him he had a very outdated book the 2nd edition! Every edition has gotten better and larger with a lot of new and updated information. Maybe I am biased, but the 5th edition is the best ever.

If you have older editions, you owe it to yourself to invest in the 5th edition. You can purchase it through my website, Zombierunner, and most online bookstores. At Amazon, it’s available in either print or Kindle formats.

 

 

Your Event Homework for Foot Care

Several months ago I had the good fortune to work on the medical team at the Jungle Marathon Amazon. My specific role was foot care of the 78 runners and to work with the others on the medical team to teach them good foot care techniques. I learned some things that I am calling, Your Event Homework…” By that I mean, your homework is to consider these five things that, if you learn them, can help you be more successful in the event.

Over seven days, I got to know most of the runners. The race offered a one-day, four-day, or seven-day event, and runners were required to carry all their gear and food in a backpack. Hammocks were mandatory and everyone had to carry a mandatory kit of emergency supplies. Because of all the gear and food, some runners limited their medical supplies to the most basic (read: as small as possible). Others had large plastic bins or bags of their mandatory gear. Most had planned well.

An Insole with an ENGO Patch

An Insole with an ENGO Patch

As runners came through the pre-race check-in to have the mandatory gear inspected, I talked to a lot of them about their shoes, socks, and – their feet. While doing this, I applied ENGO Blister Prevention Patches into many shoes. While I had a good supply of the patches, this would be the only time to get them into runner’s shoes. Once the race started, their shoes would be wet and the patches would not stick. I noticed that there was a good mix of shoes even though the runners were from around the world.

Then the race started.

Three miles into the race, there was a stream crossing. After that, their feet were almost always wet or full of sand or grit. Here are the five main things I saw.

  1. At the end of day one, one runner asked for help with his insoles. The sand and grit had worn holes in both heels. I could tell, however, that they were well worn even before he started. We dried out the insoles and I cut away any rough edges. Fortunately, the sun had dried the insoles enough to apply ENGO patches over the holes.
  2. Some runners had chosen shoes that were minimalist in design, and some did not hold up well in the rough trails in the jungle, where rocks, roots, and plants tore at the shoes’ uppers. Two runners’ shoes were shredded at their sides. The handiwork of one of the runners saved the shoes as he sewed the uppers back together with dental floss.
  3. Several runners had made bad choices in socks. All cotton socks have no place in any athletic event, much less anything over a 5km race. One runner in particular had low-rise cotton socks suitable for walking in the park, but not a seven-day race in the jungle. Another runner had only two pairs of socks, and the first pair had holes in both heels at the end of the first day.
  4. Some runners experienced problems with toenails that affected their race. Long nails, untrimmed nails, and nails with rough edges cause problems, which can lead to toe blisters, and black toenails.
  5. While some of the runners managed their feet by themselves, many came to the medical team day after day. While we were there to help, time and supplies were limited – especially time. Runners that can patch their own feet are ahead of the game. Some had the right supplies, while many others with small mandatory gear kits, did not have the necessary equipment. The medical team worked hard to patch feet as we could. Whenever we could, we made sure the runners saw what we were doing so they learned how to do it themselves. By the end of the race, I saw more that a few runners that were working on their feet and helping others.

Lessons to Learn:

  1. Make sure your insoles are in good shape. Many runners fail to remove their insoles and inspect they – to see if they need replacing. Most standard insoles are flimsy and should be replaced after several hundred miles. For a $25-$30 investment of new insoles, you’ll gain support and comfort. Investing in a marathon, ultramarathon, multi-day race, can be costly. Yes, there’s the money side, but there’s also the gear required, time spent in training, and travel. This is not the time to skimp on footwear. Chose good, high-quality shoes – preferably a design you have worn before and know works on your feet. And whatever you do, don’t wear old shoes that have seen better days.
  2. Invest in good, high-quality socks – new socks – not some dug out of your socks drawer that are threadbare. Find the right socks for your feet. Try Injinji socks if you have toe blister problems. Try a thin liner with a bit heavier outer sock. Try several types of socks to find the right amount of cushion and support.
  3. Learn how to care for your toenails. That means how to trim them and file them smooth so they don’t catch on socks or hit on the top or front of the shoe’s toe box.
  4. Runners can help themselves by learning how to manage their feet and treat any blisters that might develop. While some events have medical personnel and staff experienced in foot care, many don’t. Or they don’t have the best choices in supplies. Better to be prepared and know what your feet need – and how to manage your own feet. Then if there are people providing foot care, you can use them, and tell them if you need or want certain things done.

In the same way you train for an event, and invest in clothes and packs, and food, you must invest in your feet.

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