Exciting New Sock Technologies

May 7, 2016 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Footwear Products 

I love how technology continues to push the limits in sock construction. The companies below offer unique sock design that shows how companies are making products that stand out in a crowded field. Here are four interesting sock companies worth check out.

Ellsworth V-Channel socks have vapor channels to carry sweat vapors through the channels and off the foot – keeping the foot drier. The channels run from the toes to the heels.

Farm to Feet has developed their Blackburg Water Sock with a combination of nylons and elastic yarns in a unique design that allows water to drain quickly, dries quickly, and provides UIV protection. PTFE-coated nylon fibers create a frictionless feel.

Sensoria Fitness smart Socks harness new technology by embedding electronic threads and textile sensors, and pairs these with thin anklets on the tops of the socks, These are paired with a Smartphone app to capture step count, cadence, and foot strike forces. The full system also has a heart rate monitor for full data capture and a virtual coach in your ear.

ArmaSkin anti-blister socks offer a layer of dermal protection with their socks, engineered for extreme endurance athletes. These are thin but tight fitting and are worn under your normal socks. The Si Fusion coating sticks to the skin and prevents any friction generation next to the skin while giving a dermal like layer of skin protection. In addition, the Si Fusion hydrophobic inner pushes moisture to the outer layer and is bacteria static so the socks can be worn for long periods of time. ArmaSkin’s smooth outer fabric reduces friction by allowing the outer sock and shoe to move harmlessly over the foot – preventing blisters. They recommend not using any lubricant inside their socks – other than a small dab between toes as needed. The socks are made in Australia, making them harder to find, but their positive features make the search worthwhile.

When you purchase socks, spend a moment reading the washing instructions. With most performance socks, you should not use bleach and fabric softeners as these may break down the fibers.

Check out the above socks and buy a pair or two. As always, don’t try them for the first time in a race.

The New 6th Edition of Fixing Your Feet

This summer will see the release of the 6th edition of Fixing Your Feet: Injury Prevention and Treatment for Athletes. The exact date is still up in the air, but I’d expect it sometime in late July or early August.

The 5th edition was released in February 2011 and it was due for an update. Nothing in foot care remains static. New products and techniques are constantly being identied.

Fixing Your Feet, 6th Edition

Fixing Your Feet, 6th Edition

The new edition will be fully updated with new material, websites, new foot care products and product information, and new techniques and learning’s in footcare. I have been working with the publisher since last summer in talking about ways of improving the content. Every paragraph on every page has been evaluated to determine whether the content could be made clearer, or whether it is dated and needs to be removed. Much of the content has been expanded to provide more benefit.

The sixth edition has an important new chapter, Blister Prevention – A New Paradigm. It contains new information about blister formation and introduces the concept of shear, which in turn, changes the way we look at blister prevention and treatment. This chapter itself is worth the cost of the book.

It’s available for preorder at Amazon with their pre-order price guarantee. You can order now and if the Amazon.com price decreases between your order time and the end of the day of the release date, you’ll receive the lowest price. Here’s the link: Pre-order Fixing Your Feet, 6th edition on Amazon.

The cover is still being worked on and will likely change.

Disclaimer: the above link contains my Amazon affiliate code and a purchase through it earns me a few pennies.

Science of Ultra Interview

A while back I was interviewed about foot care by Shawn Bearden of Science of Ultra website and podcast. Here’s the link to the Science of Ultra website.

Shawn asked great questions and got deeper into foot care than any other interview I have done. We talked about the essential components of good foot care, from shoe fitting to blister care. Then we wrap it up by defining the essential features of a good minimalist foot care kit for your next run or adventure. The whole episode is about an hour and 22 minutes.

I encourage you to listen to the interview on the Science of Ultra website and then check out his website and other interviews. Podcasts can be subscribed to in iTunes and Stitcher Radio. By subscribing, you’ll received shows on your device (smart phone or tablet) as they are released.

Science of Ultra

Science of Ultra

 

Learning from Shoe Reviews

March 5, 2016 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Footwear, Footwear Products, Sports 

We can learn a lot from shoe reviews. Whether the reviews are in magazines or websites, or posted in online forums and blogs, they can be helpful to hear what others have to say about shoes you are considering. RunRepeat.com is a website that features running shoe comparisons. In late 2015 they ran the numbers from 134,867 customer reviews of 391 running shoes from 24 brands. Shoes were ranked from one to five stars based on satisfaction. Interestingly, their conclusion was that expensive shoes are not any better than more moderately priced shoes. This means inexpensive running shoes are often better rated then expensive ones. They pointed out that perceived shoe quality is very subjective and the study was not a scientifically based. One possible finding from the comparison is that runners who buy more expensive shoes likely have higher expectations, and are more critical in their reviews.

Many shoe and boot companies suggest specific models that are best for certain types of activities and sports, and for certain types of feet. They do this because many shoes are made for a specific type of foot—and many people have feet that will work better with one type of shoe than another. Look for the buyer’s guides in the magazines of your sport. Runners can find shoe reviews in Runner’s World, Trail Runner, and UltraRunning. Backpackers and hikers can check out Backpacker magazine’s reviews, and Outside magazine’s Buyer’s Guide for helpful information.4 Wear Tested Gear Reviews (weartested.org) is another good site with reviews. Many online shoe retailers also offer phone advice support or online guides. For information on shoe reviews and gear review sources, see page xref in the appendix. Other sport-specific magazines may offer similar reviews. Many websites are now posting reviews, and some offer reader comments or reviews.

The September 2015 Runner’s World Shoe Finder asked up front if readers knew the type of shoe that worked best for them. If so, they were guided to a four-section grid based on more shoe, less shoe, and more cushioning, less cushioning. Each box of the grid contained shoes they recommended for that more/less choice. Other readers were asked questions about BMI, running mileage, and injury experience, after which they too were directed to one of the four boxes to find their recommended shoes. Each shoe reviewed was also rated for heel cushioning, forefoot cushioning, and flexibility; and the shoe’s weight and heel and forefoot heights were given. Unfortunately, these guides of suggested shoes usually only include 12-18 shoe models.

It’s a good starting point, but I would use the guides as a reference point to shop at my local running store and get their personal insights.

Even after buying shoes that fit well, be alert to changes inside your shoes as you walk, run, and hike. Jason Pawelsky, with Tamarack, the maker of the popular ENGO Blister Prevention Patches reminds, “We all know that changing conditions (terrain, temperature, distance, etc) can make even the best fitting pair of shoes feel and perform differently so there is no perfect fit 100% of the time. The challenge is to get runners, hikers and team sports players to not only recognize that, but to react proactively.”

Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights

January 22, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Footwear Products, Health 

If you run in the dark, whether roads or trails, the Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights might be perfect for you. The lights are designed by athletes.

Night Runner 270

Night Runner 270 Shoe Lights

The lights attach to the shoelaces with multi-position adjustable brackets and weigh only 1.5 ounces. The lights give off a combined total of 150 lumens to light up the road, sidewalk, or trail in front of you. With white LEDs pointing forward and a red LED on the outside facing backwards, you are covered with 270 degrees of visibility – and you get 30+ meters in beam distance. The units are made with high-impact water-resistant casings for durability. The lights are powered by rechargeable Li-ion batteries with 4-8 hours of battery light. A supplied micro-port USB cable with a Y connection charges both units at the same time. A pair of lights sells for $59.95 and a two pair set for $109.95.

The Night Runner 270 Kit

The Night Runner 270 Kit

If you have carried hand-held lights or a headlamp, the Night Runner 270 Degree Shoe Lights are worth considering. They could also be used for cycling. The Night Runner lights started as a Kickstarter project.

 

Making Overlapping Toe Separators – Part 2

This second version of a toe separator is a more complicated to make and apply. It uses a large or small ENGO oval, depending on the size of the toes. The idea is to pinch the patch into an upside down T where the base of the T goes between the two problem toes. The patch is stuck to your insole in a position where it keeps the two toes apart. The slippery surface of the ENGO patch will prevent rubbing and the upward base of the upside down T will keep one toe from going under the other toe.

Toe separator #2 on an insole

Toe separator #2 on an insole

How to Make Your Own Toe Separator # 2

Using a utility knife, score two cuts, about one inch apart on the backside of the patch. Make them only deep enough to cut through the paper backing – do not cut through the patch itself. Try to have the one-inch wide space in the middle of the patch. Make the width of the cuts wide enough so the folded separator will be tall enough to match the height of the toes it will go between. This is important – a separator used between middle toes will have to be taller than ones used for pinky toes. Men’s toes may also require taller separators. Using the tip of the knife, remove the one-inch strip. Fold the patch in half so the sticky sides match to each other. The two end of the cut backing should meet in the middle. You can now open the two ends and cut the patch into the needed shape based on where the patch will go on the insole and the length of your toes.

Separator # 2 Height and Length

Toe separator between toes with Injinji socks

Toe separator between toes with Injinji socks

Separators for pinky toes need to be shorter in height and length than ones for the middle toes. You may have to make more than one separator based on the size you need to find the right fit.

How to Use the Separator # 2

To use the separator in your shoe, remove the insole for the foot with the overlapping toes. The smoother the insole the better the patch will stick. Clean the surface of the insole of all lint, dust or other things that could interfere with the patch adhering. Make sure the insoles are dry. Put the insole on the floor and stand on it so your foot falls into any indentations. Usually, an insole will have indentations under the heel, ball of the foot, and some of the toes. Using a pen, make a mark between the two affected toes. Put on a pair of Injinji socks and make sure the marking is still in the right place.

Once the placement has been confirmed, with sock on, place the separator between the two toes to make sure it fits. The best way to do this is with your foot on the insole. The height should come up to the top of the toes with sock on. If the height is too high, trim it with a scissors. If it’s too low, make another separator where the pinched section is higher.

Toe separator between 2nd and 3rd toes with Injinji socks

Toe separator between 2nd and 3rd toes with Injinji socks

The length needs to be long enough to cover the body of the toe – without hitting the crease between the toes. If the separator touches the crease, it could rub and cause problems, especially if the foot moves forward in the shoe. If it’s too long, trim it with a scissors.

Once the fit has been checked, you can place the separator on the insole. Line it up so the upward part is in the correct place. Then remove the protective backing to expose the adhesive and place the patch on the insole with the upward part over the line on the insole. Rub the separator to make sure it is firmly secured to the insole. Use a scissors to trim any part that extends over the sides of the insole. Use a blow dryer for a few

If the patch does not stick, you probably have an insole with a surface that is not smooth enough or too soft with too much fabric that does not allow the adhesive to hold. In this case, you may want to try another insole with a better surface. They can be peeled off the insole if they are placed wrong, but will probably not stick as well if you try to reattach them. The patches will not stick to a wet insole. For easier removal, use a blow dryer or heat gun to heat the patch.

If the Separator # 2 is Too Weak

It’s possible that the pinched section of the ENGO patch will be too weak or thin to keep the toe from going under the next toe. If you can tell the toe is going under, here’s an idea to make it stronger. Take another ENGO Patch and cut a strip the width of the top of the separator, remove the adhesive backing, and pinch it over the existing separator so it reinforces the upward part of the separator and extends onto the base. This will strengthen the part between the toes and make it stiffer and better able to keep one toe from going under the other.

Sources

Injinji socks and ENGO patches can be purchased at Zombierunner.com. The patches can also be purchased at the ENGO website. Disclosure: I have an affiliate relationship with Zombierunner.

The ICESPIKE Traction System

December 19, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Footwear, Footwear Products, Sports 

ICESPIKES have been around for a while and have proven themselves to be a reliable tool for those wanting to run, walk, and hike in winter conditions.

It doesn’t take much in bad conditions to take a nasty fall. Landing on hard ice, a rocky trail, or rocks hidden under snow can ruin your day. Protecting your tailbone, hands and wrists, knees, hips, and ankles, and your back is key to staying active. This is where ICESPIKES come in.

Icespike Traction System

Icespike Traction System

ICESPIKES are a traction system of 32 spikes that are applied directly into the sole of your shoes or boots. Their cold-rolled, tool quality steel will maintain hardness and grip 10 times longer than other systems. The spikes are self-cleaning, while their patented design provided great penetration and stability. They should last up to 500 miles.

ICESPIKES allow you to run, walk, and hike through the winter with the anti-slip spikes

ICESPIKES can also be used in water, mud and muck conditions, on slick rocks and gravel, uneven and root-bound terrain; and in mossy and slick leaf conditions.

For a limited time, use the coupon code “stockingstuffer” for 20% off your purchase.

ICESPIKES are packaged in a kit of 32 spikes and an installation tool and in packages of 32 spikes.

ENGO Blister Prevention Patches

Today’s post will cover a great way to prevent blisters using ENGO Blister Prevention Patches. It’s a repeat of a post from mid-2013.

Tamarack Habilitation Technologies is well known for providing healthcare professionals and clients with innovative, value-added orthotic-prosthetic componentry and materials. Their ShearBan product is similar to the ENGO Blister Prevention Patches reviewed in this article. ShearBan is used in the orthopaedic and prosthetic industry on prostheses at amputation stump sites to reduce the incidence of skin breakdown.

ENGO in Footwear

ENGO in Footwear

ENGO in Footwear

Introduced in 2004, ENGO Blister Prevention Patches have radically redefined the way hot spots, blisters and calluses are treated. As a preventative measure, ENGO patches provide peace-of-mind that blisters won’t become a painful, debilitating problem. If a blister has already formed, applying patches to footwear, corresponding to the blistered area eliminates painful irritation and further skin damage, allowing continued activity. Friction forces are reduced by more than 50% when you apply an ENGO Patch to your footwear.

ENGO Applied

ENGO Applied

ENGO Applied

The patches are made from an ultra-thin Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film and are 0.015 inches total thickness – a very slippery surface. They are very durable, lasting four to six weeks in most applications. The aggressively sticky patch peels away from the backing and is applied to dry shoes or boots. The PTFE ENGO Patch reduces the ‘stickiness’ between the shoe and sock so they can glide over one another. The foot, inside the sock, glides over the patch shear distortion and friction are reduced, and blisters can be averted, in spite of pressure.

Avid runners, hikers and sports players rely on their feet to reach performance goals; from day hikes to ultra marathons. But quality footwear and socks alone don’t eliminate the skin trauma your feet can experience from repetitive rubbing — building friction forces to levels that cause hot spots, blisters and calluses. While I use these patches in runners’ footwear at races, they can also be used in ordinary every day shoes to reduce calluses.

Similar to Tamarack’s ShearBan material, ENGO patches are applied directly to footwear and equipment, not to the skin. Outcomes of this unique application include ease of use, long-lasting and guaranteed friction relief.

ENGO Patch in Shoe

ENGO Patch in Shoe

ENGO Patches are made in several sizes and types:

  • A large oval – 2 ¾ x 1 ¾
  • A small oval – 2 x 1 ½
  • A rectangle – 3 ¾ x 2 ¾
  • Back of the heel patch – 3 ¾ x 1 ¾
  • A cushion heel wrap – 3 ¾ x 1 ½

When I work a race I always have a bag with different sizes of ENGO patches. I have applied the ovals and rectangles and the back of the heel patches. The patches are applied to the shoes and insoles – not to your skin. This means wherever you are going to apply a patch has to be dry. My advice is to apply patches before your race when your shoes are dry. I have used them inside the shoes in the sides, in the heels, and on the insoles.

ENGO in a Shoe's Heel

ENGO in a Shoe’s Heel

Typical problem areas in footwear are under the heel and forefoot, and at the side of the heel. An oval patch can be applied to overlap the side of the heel counter and the insole as seen is the photo. I often use a rectangle or large oval under the ball of the foot or an oval under the heel – applied directly to the insole. The patches are useful over stitching or seams in footwear that are rubbing the wearer. If necessary, a patch can be cut to shape for where it will be applied.

The patches will reduce shear and friction; provide relief from hot spot and blister pain, and can be used in any type of insole or orthotic and footwear, from sandals to running shoes, and any type of hiking or ski boot.

I like ENGO patches because they work. The patch is thin and does not alter the fit of the shoe. When properly applied to dry footwear, they stick.

Rebecca Rushton, a podiatrist in Australia, strongly recommends ENGO Patches. She discovered the patches after getting blisters herself and now represents ENGO in Australia. She has written several free reports on blister prevention available on her website, Blister Prevention.

If you are unclear about shear and blister formation, here’s a link to my article An Introduction to Shear and Blister Formation.

The Technical Stuff

JM Carlson, in a 2009 report wrote, “The measurement of friction is the ‘coefficient of friction’. The coefficient of friction (COF) is a number that represents this slipperiness or stickiness between two surfaces and is generally below 1.0. Within the shoe, the COF between the foot, socks and insole can range from 0.5 – 0.9. In contrast the COF between a sock and a polished floor is around 0.2.” Tests have shown PTFE patches to reduce the coefficient of friction (COF) in the shoe by up to 80%. The COF is in approximately 0.16, which is significantly lower than all other in-shoe materials. Importantly, the low COF is maintained even in most and wet conditions inside the shoe.

Check out GoEngo.com for more information about ENGO Blister Prevention Patches. They also offer a money-back guarantee.

8 Top Tips for Foot Care

8 Top Tips for Foot Care    

If you are a subscriber to Backpacker magazine, check out the October issue, page 34 for a full page of eight top tips to care for your feet. I have included an image of the page in this post. If you click on the image, you’ll get a larger view.

I was contacted by Backpacker several months ago and did a phone interview. Here are the eight tips:

  1. Trim nails
  2. Get in shape
  3. Fix calluses
  4. Prep your shoes
  5. Pack camp sandals
  6. Two ways to treat blood under a nail
  7. Wash your socks
  8. Lance right
8 Top Tips for Foot Care

8 Top Tips for Foot Care

The tips are good whether you are a backpacker, runner, walker, adventure racer, or just plain person who loves the outdoors.

I like Backpacker magazine. It’s one of my favorites. I encourage you to pick up a copy and check it out.

Foot Care Preparation for Primal Quest – or Your Next Event

The seven tips below are written for the Primal Quest Expedition Adventure Race starting next week. They are also applicable to any race you may have coming up.

Primal Quest is less than two weeks away and here are seven things you can do to improve your chances of finishing with healthy feet.

1.    Wear the best fitting shoes you can. Have a bit of space in front of your longest toe and enough height in the shoe’s toe box to avoid squishing the toes from the top.

2.    Bad toenail care can result in toe blisters and black toenails, where fluid or blood is under the nail. Trim your toenails short and then use a nail file to smooth the tip of the nail. File the nails from the top over the edge down toward the tip of the toe. The goal of the trimming and filing is to remove any rough or sharp edges. File the nails so when you run your fingertip up and over the tip of the toe no rough edges are felt. It’s even better to file the nail so that no tip of the nail is felt. If you have thick nails, file the top of the nail down to reduce its thickness.

3.    Any time you can, remove your shoes and socks to dry and air your feet. Your feet will be wet from water disciplines, stream crossings, cooling yourself off by pouring water over yourself, and simply sweaty feet. When stopping to eat or rest, remove your shoes and socks. Lay your socks in the sun to dry and switch to a clean dry pair if possible. Issues caused by wet feet will multiply over time and can end your race or at the least, result in extremely painful feet.

4.    Do everything in your power to prevent and reduce maceration. This means not letting water poured over your head get into your shoes by bending over before dousing yourself. If means following the tips outlined in # 2 above.  Use a moisture-controlling agent to help prevent the skin on the bottoms of your feet from macerating. Several include Desitin Maximum Strength Original Paste (available at drug stores, Walmart, etc), zinc oxide, Chafe X, SportsSlick, Trail Toes, and RunGoo. Apply liberally and before all water segments to help prevent damage to your skin. Once serious maceration happens, only drying your feet and letting them air, with the help of powder and warmth, will reverse the condition. If left unchecked, the skin can fold over on itself, split open, and tear layers of skin off the bottom of your feet.

5.    Use gaiters to prevent pebbles and rocks, trail dust, and other debris from getting inside your shoes and socks. These become irritants and can lead to hot spots and blisters.

6.    Take care of small issues before they become larger problems. Lance and drain small blisters whenever you feel them to keep them from becoming larger. Put a dab of ointment over the blister and then apply a strip of tape over the top to protect the skin.

7.    Finally, make sure you have the supplies to treat your feet out on the course. Waiting to get to a TA to repair a blister can make a small problem much larger.

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