Zederna Insoles

Zederna Insoles eliminate unpleasant foot smell, athlete’s foot and nail fungus effectively and simply. Its antibacterial works where foot odor and athlete’s foot develop.Put the thin (1/16 inch) and flexible high-quality cedarwood Zederna Insoles into your shoes. Foot odor disappears immediately and a very pleasant smell of fresh softwood remains. The new formation of athlete’s foot and nail fungus is prevented. Existing athlete’s foot fades away after a few days.

Generally foot odor and athlete’s foot do not come from sweat, which surrounds your feet. It comes from bacteria on the skin, which is decomposed by the sweat. The waste product of this decomposition leaves a very unpleasant smell and is an ideal breeding climate for athlete’s foot and nail fungus.

Zederna Insoles

Zederna Insoles

The Zederna Insole is a 100% natural product from thin cedarwood. The back consists of a stabilizing cotton layer. The sole is flexible and adapts to your foot form after a few steps. It gives you a very comfortable feeling (even if you carry orthopedic inserts). Your feet can take a deep breath nearly as liberating as walking barefoot.

Here’s how Zederna Insoles work:

  • The natural suction force of Zederna cedarwood absorbs the sweat effectively
  • The Zederna Insole and its antibacterial effect work where foot odor and athlete’s foot develop
  • Smell and fungus creating bacteria are eliminated
The Zederna Effect

The Zederna Effect

Here’s my take on the insoles. I wore a pair in my work shoes for months. My old insoles were a regular stock style and I used them because they were already in the shoes. I immediately liked the Zederna Insoles. I felt my feet were cooler and more comfortable. I liked the wood feel – my feet were not stuck to a fabric synthetic insole, but could move around on the cedarwood. Between my commute and work, I had my shoes on for 12 hours straight. The insoles were pleasant. They are perfect to use in your shoes after training.

Because they are thin, I think they could easily be used in running shoes or boots. I would wear them in training, and then, depending on the feel, I’d make the decision to wear then in a race or not.

Zederna Insole Advantages:

  • Foot odor disappears immediately!
  • Athlete’s foot disappears after a few days.
  • The new formation of athlete’s foot is permanently prevented.
  • The treatment of existing nail fungus with conventional methods is accelerated by more than 50%, because of the dry and antibacterial foot climate.
  • The new formation of toenail fungus is permanently prevented.
  • Plug & play: Just insert the insole in your shoes and start. Annoying treatments with gels and powder belongs to the past.
  • Naturopathic treatment: The effect is purely based on natural power. No chemistry.
  • As a result of the polished surface and the flexibility of the Zederna Insole, pleasant feeling arises also when wearing without socks.
  • The Zederna inserts provide a pleasant and dry climate in your shoes. Comparable to walking in a forest: in summer it is relatively cool and in winter it is always warmer.
  • Long durability of the Zederna Insoles.
  • Reliable quality – Made in Germany.
  • Comfortable subscription available.
  • Fast delivery within a few days.
  • More than 9.500 satisfied customers.
  • Money back guarantee, if you are not satisfied with our product.

Disclaimer: I received a pair of Zederna Insoles to try. Beyond that, I have no financial investment in Zederna.

Blood Blisters

July 22, 2012 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care 

In reality, most blisters don’t have blood in them. Repeated heavy pressure (friction) or simply long periods of pressure can turn an ordinary blister into a blood blister.

The fluid will go from clear to light pink, and with continued pressure, to blood red.

The general rule of thumb is not to lance and drain any blood blister. You may have to pad the area to take the pressure off the blood-filled skin. You need to now how to manage a ruptured blood blister.

Here’s why. The problem with blood blisters is that by draining them, the athlete’s circulatory system is opened to possible infection. In a sterile environment or at your home, this may not be an issue. However out on a trail, or somewhere where the athlete may be unable to keep his feet clean, it’s a different story. Where the blister is on the foot can present more problems. A blood blister on the side of the heel is not as problematic as one on the bottom of the foot. The opened blister is exposed to dirt, grime and any bacteria on whatever is touching the skin. Blood blister must be treated as wounds.

Another issue is whether the athlete has he right supplies in his foot care kit to patch the blister. Opening it up and not applying antibiotic ointment and a covering it is a huge mistake.

I tell athletes that normally blood blisters are not lanced because that is the wise thing to say. If everyone thinks they can simply lance them, without fully understanding how to care for them, we’ll have a lot of people with infected feet.

At Badwater last year we had a runner with a very large heel blood blister. She was from Brazil and would be flying home – but she was also a diabetic. Because of her diabetic status, we declined to lance the blister. It would not have been safe.

Arch of the foot blood blister

Arch of the foot blood blister

The photo here is from last week’s Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley. The runner had completed the 135-mile race. I talked to him at the finish line and told him the pitfalls of lancing a blood blister. I told him to shower and be careful of popping it and to come see us in the medical room if it did pop. It popped when he was in the shower, the best of all places.

I cleaned the area with alcohol wipes and lanced the blister with a #11 scalpel. I made three cuts so any more fluid would be forced out as he walked. I expelled the blood and applied a generous layer of antibiotic ointment. A gauze 4×4 was placed over the top and then the foot was wrapped with Coban, a wrap material that sticks only to itself. I gave the runner a Zip-Lock bag with a small tube of ointment, several more 4x4s, a Popsicle stick to apply the ointment. I told him he could unwrap the Coban and reuse it multiple times. Then I asked him if his Tetanus was up to date after which I gave him the usual infection speech.

Recheck the blister three times a day for signs of the infection. Each time you check, apply a new coating of antibiotic ointment and change the dressing. Early treatment can keep the infection from becoming more serious.

An infected blister may be both seen and felt. An infection will be indicated by any of the following: redness, swelling, red streaks up the limb, pain, fever, and pus. Treat the blister as a wound. Clean it frequently and apply an antibiotic ointment. Frequent warm water or Epsom salt soaks can also help the healing process. Stay off the foot as much as possible and elevate it above the level of your heart. If the infection does not seem to subside over 24 to 48 hours, see a doctor.

It’s wise to keep a tube of antibiotic ointment in your foot care kit. You may never get a blood blister, but then again, you might. And if you get one, it may not rupture, but then again, it might.

It’s better to be prepared by knowing how to care for blood blisters.

 

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