A Foot Care Success Story

March 17, 2013 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 

Every so often I hear a foot care story from an athlete that intrigues me. It’s fun to read their story about their issues with their feet and then the steps they took to find answers.

One of the best examples of this is Nathan’s story on page four in the 5th edition of Fixing Your Feet. He told the story of how he studied foot care techniques and learned hot to manage his feet – and successfully finished Racing the Planet’s Australia race.

Then the other day I received an email from Karen. I liked her story and asked if I could share it with my readers. She agreed. Here is what she wrote.

First, I am extremely prone to blisters. Initially I thought it was friction. I tried Hydropel, but its sticky nature attracted dirt but did nothing to calm my problem. At Fruita one year, Lisa and Jay (Smith) Batchen shared their knowledge in a presentation about the three primary causes and the light bulb went off. Hydration is my primary issue – specifically bloating.  The bloating happens because I’m no longer processing fluids.

After working thru formulas and cause and effect for several years on my own, I finally solicited help from Scott Jurek -I knew him from Coyote events. Mutual friends had helped me focus on running nutrition, but I wasn’t making progress on my own. Scott helped me maintain my ability to process fluids and enabled me to delay bloating and blisters.

When I get blisters, they’ll either start as a hot spot on my pads or a painful toenail. I get them under my toenails (which I keep extremely short) or the entire pad of my foot/feet will get it. Over New Years with a very low mileage base, I went to California and ran/hiked 34 miles. Had a hot spot early that I actually taped, and a blister on a toe but that was it – a sign that I was on the right track!

I’ve also become smarter on dealing with my blisters. I still get them, but they aren’t crippling. Once after my first attempt at the Leanhorse 100, they were so bad they caused me to miss the cutoff, and they got dangerously infected. Two years later, I went back and finished – it was my first 100. I still got blisters but they didn’t prevent me from meeting my goals.

Here’s what I do now for my feet other than monkey with hydration:

  • Work on my calluses and keep my toenails trimmed
  • Get my orthotics re-surfaced at least a couple months before event
  • Keep my shoes and socks current too and only use Smartwool socks
  • Train on the exact terrain I expect and work on the plan for my feet – it’s just as important as my physical and nutritional race plans
  • My starting feet recipe is to use BodyGlide on my feet before putting on socks. Then change my socks every 20 miles if I’m running anything over 50K.
  • Carry a foot kit on my back at all times with a couple Engo Pads for hot spots on my orthotics, a couple of alcohol wipes, blister pads and a safety pin, and duct tape for real emergencies on a pencil or on my water bottle
  • A full fledged foot kit for crew or in a later drop bag with new supplies for my carry kit, Desitin if it’s wet conditions, and tape/scissors/tincture for the next defense. An injection devise and zinc oxide and Second Skin/New Skin as final defense. I had to do all three lines of defense to actually finish Leanhorse, but we did it.

Thank you Karen for sharing your foot care plan.

Blister Prevention – The Long Version

January 13, 2013 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Health 

Today’s post is long, but illustrates a valuable point. The Facebook post below started a long chain of responses – all suggestions on what the poster could do to eliminate her blister problem. There were a total of 64 responses. Let’s get right to what was initially posted.

Original Facebook Post

So some of you may remember the nasty blood blister I got during Boston in 2011. I am very unhappy to say I have another one as a result of yesterday. Today I will be doing a GREAT amount of reading on not only how to treat but prevent this from happening again. My next long run is 20 miles. I think that moleskin is going to become my new best friend for EVERY long run.

Side of the foot blister

Side of the foot blister

Fifty-four Responses

I use Sportslick and only wear Wright socks (thin, double layer) for long runs. For my last Ironman I put anti-perspirant on my feet everyday for a week before the race. I got no blisters. Good luck!

Soldiers have been known to wear panty hose footies during marches. And tape every hot spot.

Going to look up mole skin because since I lost 90+, my sneakers were huge on me and I didn’t realize it so after the bursitis incident I walked a few miles and had horrible blood blisters that were UBER painful. I applied Band-Aids the next day and kept hustling… moleskin eh? Thank you and healing love to your blisters. They hurt!

May be time to re-evaluate your shoes. I got a whopper this summer after a 20 miler. My inserts in that particular pair of shoes were causing me to run a little odd.

Moleskin! I used it with any shoe that pinches or rubs, especially heels. I found cleaning my skin with alcohol first helps it adhere the best and stays even after taking showers!

If you have sweaty feet be warned moleskin can be sweated off. It is probably the best out there though to prevent blister. If it gets rolled or folded it can make the problem worse.

I use Sportslick and wear Wright socks as well. No blisters as of yet. It got me through my first marathon with no blisters and it rained that day and my feet were soaked. It didn’t do much for my bruised toe nails though lately I have been using Monkey Butt” anti-chafing powder when training for triathlons. Have had great results with this product with my bike shorts. But for feet, I would recommend Sportslick as it is a thick petroleum based ointment. Best of luck! And remember, one foot in front of the other. It doesn’t have to get any more complicated than that!

New shoes may also be the answer. I switched from running in Nike Air Pegasus years ago to Mizuno Wave Riders with little to no blistering. Turns out I needed a narrower toe box and the Nike Pegasus toe boxes would stretch a great deal over time.

Research socks and use a Bodyglide type product
.

I have hyper mobility in my feet. I was using Sauconys. Horrible foot pain. Got some Mizuno. Best shoes ever! I can run without pain!

I use anti-perspirant and change my socks every 5 miles
.

Try Balega dry fit socks. I NEVER get blisters anymore and I’ve completed two marathons and two Ironmans in them. Used to get blisters all of the time before I switched!

Mizunos + Bodyglide + a great fitting pair of socks = No blisters… ever again!

I get the cheap Monistat anti-chafing cream and put that on my blister prone areas, and it works perfect!

My latest blood blister peeled off the end of my toe just this week! I had a little party!

Have you ever tried Smartwool socks? They are pricey, but worth it. I haven’t had a blister since I started wearing them on my runs
.

We always wore two thinner pairs of socks in high school if we had history of blisters… one pair inside and it worked like a charm.

Inside out [socks].

Here’s my 2 cents! I keep my toenails as short as I can handle- short! Smear on some Vaseline between my toes wear the same brand of sox and so far so good.

Moleskin is amazing, and glide works well too. I have heard if you’re in a pinch use deodorant where there is any friction.

In the years I have done marathons/half marathons, I find that having the right shoes, using wicking socks (I too use the Wright socks), and use talc/baby powder in between my toes I do not get blisters.

I gave up on running because of constant and ongoing blisters, I tried several shoes etc nothing helped, I loved running but those blisters were so painful, what is moleskin?

Totally agree with Smartwool socks. They rock.

Try Nuskin. I have a friend who is a marathon runner and this company is her sponsor. Supposedly very good!

Love moleskin! I get wicked blisters without it and none with it. The stuff rocks! Superb for healing blisters too!

Military uses just basic slip on panty hose/dress socks especially with long hauls when carrying 80+lbs in the desert – it works and it is cheap.

Mole Skin and my hiking boots = Love.

Panty hose and then socks over?

I swear by these don’t know if you have used/seen them – Nike Elite Anti-Blister Low-Cut Tab Running Socks.

I spray my feet with Trislide if I start getting any rubbing in my shoes. I can run barefoot and not get a blister no matter how long I go.

SUPER HELPFUL! OKAY NOW FOR TREATMENT FOR MY EXISTING BLISTER? IDEAS? I HAVE RUNS THIS WEEK.

There are lacing techniques that you can try to that help prevent this – as with some of the other comments; you may need a different shoe or sock. I’m sorry, that’s such a pain! I recently switched from Saucony to Mizuno’s & have had a really great experience so far.

Try the book Fixing Your Feet by John Vonhof. We ultra runners swear by this book.

Yeah I do believe my Saucony Kinvaras are out for this very reason. Both times I wore them – in Boston and again yesterday it happened.

The best stuff for blister is Compeed. It is now sold by Band-Aid as Blister Band-Aid and still says Compeed on the box. You can put over the blister and still run without feeling anything. I always carry with me on races. Just in case!

To heal the latest blisters I had to pop them as they were so big I couldn’t put shoes on. Then I cut the size of the blister out of the center of the moleskin and place it over/around the blister. Kept blister clean and voila, perfectly fine that night!

Yes – pantyhose and then socks over – they glide and no friction in between skin and toes.

I play hockey and some girls get the worst blisters from skates. It was actually a doctor on our team that recommended using duct tape! It does work better than moleskin and with good socks. This is at the stage where you are getting irritated in a certain spot, not of course after the blister has formed!

I second the double sock and panty hose method. I actually found ones you wear for ballet flats very helpful. Not sure how they would do on long hauls as I was a short and medium distance sprinter. Cheap and easy.

I have ran a ton of marathons and have stopped getting blisters when I purchased a good pair of socks and bought my shoes a size and a half bigger. So one good sock and big shoes = happy feet.

What you are describing sounds like poorly fitted shoes to me. Make sure you get fitted a good running shoe store, and tell them up front that you have a problem area. A good running shoe fitter should be able to fix the problem.

Knee high pantyhose along with powder maybe but the pantyhose should protect your feet from the friction.

You need to check out Incrediwear.com – they have the best socks for runners. My husband does marathons and I’ve recently started running myself. There is no question our feet don’t hurt and they wick away the sweat. They are made with bamboo charcoal and they increase blood circulation.

Wright socks!! I get them sometimes. But I wear Vibram FiveFinger shoes. And any other running shoes I have are minimalist shoes. So not socks… But if you do wear socks. Get some 2-layer Wright” socks! They are awesome. Or an old army trick. Wear nylons/knee highs under socks.

You are not supposed to pop blisters ever. If they pop on their own fine. But I would cover it up with something like the moleskin or a blister Band-Aid and wear good socks and shoes. I like the knee-high panty hose idea. Good luck & feel better!

Duct tape.

I hate to hear that girl…I run in Asics, and those socks I told you about and have never had a blister…sorry feel better girl!

I remember that blister because I had an awful one at the same time! I finally stopped getting them when I went to a actual running store, they fitted me with a pair of Sauconys with a wide toe box and laced them just from the middle of the shoe and up. In all the miles I ran after that never got another blister and my black toenails grew out and had no more problems with that either! It’s the wide toe box that saved my feet.

If the blister is open, use vitamin E oil on it at night. Air it out as much as possible. If the blisters are so large you can’t wear shoes, take a cleaned (alcohol) safety pin and drain. Don’t tear skin off. It is best not to pop but sometimes it’s needed. Motrin for the pain may seem extreme but if you r in so much pain and start altering your stride you’ll get even more blisters.

Try Second Skin. It works very good for soldiers. In two days your feet will be like new!

I never got blisters-and i used to run 65 miles a week. My trick was either Thorlo socks, or wearing two pairs of snug socks. And wearing shoes that were a full size larger. My favorites are Kswiss performance. When running distance, your feet swell so much, you need the space to be able to accommodate it.

Vibrams! They literally took away all my feet problems, including blisters. I love them.

Essential oils are helpful for treating the actual blister. Lavender and tea tree (also called Melaleuca) will help it heal. Apply 2-3 drops of each every couple hours – or when you think of it really. I hope it feels better… they are nasty.

I grease my toes and footpad down with simple cocoa butter Vaseline before any run or distance walk! Haven’t had a blister since! Took a couple times to get used to the immediate feel, but now a year later with no blisters, I hardly notice I’m doing it any more! It’s cheap & simple! And, foot fitting socks! I have my favorite kind that I own multiple pairs of, got them at the local Fred Meyer!

I do the same for long runs. And sometimes baby powder to. Helps with the moisture.

After all 54 responses, I had to weigh in. Here’s what I wrote:  

As the author of Fixing Your Feet, I’ll comment that some of what has been suggested here is good but some is not what I would recommend. There is no “one right” answer to the ago-old blister problem. There are many causes and many answers. Try some and find what works for your feet. What’s important is fit, socks, trimmed and filed nails, reducing calluses, and a high-quality lube if needed to reduce friction.

Later, I emailed Jenny and based on what she described and the picture of the blister, here is my response to her.

Let’s talk treatment first. Because it’s a blood blister, I’d try to keep the roof intact. If it opens, your circulatory system is open to possible infection.  I lance them, but I am used to doing that, and give the athlete a lecture on infection. Generally if you soak your foot in warm/hot water with Epson Slats, several times a day, the blood and fluid will be reabsorbed – and the blister will harden. Over time, after that, the top layer of skin may slough off but by then, the possibility of infection is over. Start there. If the blister ruptures, make sure you use an antibiotic ointment and keep it covered. Signs of infection are redness, heat, swelling, pus, pain, and streaks moving up the foot. That becomes serious. Make sure your Tetanus shot is up to date (usually about every 8-10 years).

As far a prevention goes, here are a few thoughts:

  1. I think I see the edge of callus at the forward edge of the blister. I don’t like calluses. Try and reduce any you might have.
  2. Do you have bunions? If so, that changes a few of my ideas.
  3. I’d guess that you have a shoe issue (meaning fit). If you have wide feet, or the shoes you wear are too narrow, you’ll have these problems. I read you wore the same shoes both time this happened. That’s a good sign you don’t have a good fit. A better fitting shoes could solve your problem.  Can you get fitted at a good running store?
  4. Something else I see is that the bottom edge of the blister is right at the edge of where the insole hits the side of the shoe. This again gets to the issue of fit. There is pressure there, creating friction, that cayses the blister, that builds from this bottom edge upward.
  5. One option is to protect the area with a strip of tape. Duct tape isn’t the best, but would work. Don’t use white athletic tape. It won’t stick. I prefer Leukotape.
  6. You could cut a horizontal slit in the side of the shoe over the pressure point.
  7. I hate moleskin and never use it. It does not stick well, does not conform to the shape of the area, and is too thick. Stick to tape. The ONLY kind I would recommend is Profoot Velvetex Moleskin (available on Amazon).
  8. Only wear moisture wicking socks.

Something to understand, that I preach all the time, is that what works for one person will not necessarily work for another. That goes for socks, shoes, lubricants, powders, etc. We each are an experiment of one and need to determine what our feet need. Keep me posted.

Spartathlon Feet

October 6, 2012 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Health 

Several years ago I met Gregg at Badwater in Death Valley. We were in line to check in at Furnace Creek and I heard the last name. It was the same as an aunt of mine. Turns out we are related.

At Badwater he ran well and finished near the top. Later that year, he and his wife moved to Asia and I had not heard from him – until the other day. He sent an email about running the Spartathlon in Greece. It’s a 246-kilometer (153 mile) race between Athens and Sparta. The Spartathlon aims to trace the footsteps of Pheidippides, an Athenian messenger sent to Sparta in 490 BC to seek help against the Persians in the Battle of Marathon. Here’s his email:

I just finished running Spartathlon. It was nearly as hot as Badwater (100.4), ok maybe not as hot as Badwater, but it was far to hot for this race, considering it is normally 86. The race by the way is fantastic; I would highly recommend that you make a trip out there if you get the chance.

So, I took a photo of my feet after the race and thought you might like the photo, being that you are the foot guy. Might make for a good example. The blister appeared to start from underneath the pad of my foot by my big toe. The pressure built up so much that it formed the blister on top of my foot as well – as you can see from the photo. Pretty cool if you ask me. I probably ran with it for 50 miles, since I didn’t change my shoes and didn’t feel like taking them off. They lanced it when I finished… as I was receiving two bags of IV fluid. Haven’t had any problems with it since, although it has taken a few days for the pressure under my foot to slowly recede.

Spartathlon Feet

Spartathlon Feet

As you can see in the photo, there is blood in the blister. Here’s where you have to be careful and take precautions to prevent infection. I don’t encourage people to lance these on their own, but in aid stations with the right equipment and knowledge, it can be done. When I do it, I always give the athlete the warning signs of infection: redness, warm to the touch, pain, fever, pus, and swelling. If you have a blood blister, be careful.

Really though, Gregg’s feet look pretty good for just having run 153 miles. Don’t you agree?

A Wart Story – Part II

September 3, 2012 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Foot Care, Health 

Part I of this story on August 22 was The Wart Story.  It tells what Brad did to get rid of a stubborn wart on the bottom of his heel. He tried a lot of treatments and ended up having it excised through surgery. After I posted the story, Brad emailed with a follow-up. I’ll let Brad tell Part II. (If you scroll down, you’ll get to Part I).

It’s now been 4-1/2 years since the surgery described in your Aug 22, 2012 posting.  The wart in that area was completely removed, however, there is a fair amount of scar tissue.  I normally don’t notice it unless I rub the area, or very rarely when walking barefoot.  During my pre-op visit, I was told to expect this common side effect.  It has the feeling of a large callous.

Now flash forward about three years:  I’ve been wearing thongs in public showers, but I live in my Tevas sandles, I can’t give up beach volleyball, and occasionally go outside barefoot to bring the garbage cans in.  And unfortunately ended up with another wart.  My doctor and I decided to try the blistering agent again.  (He said the compound was derived from beetles, so I’m guessing it might have been antharidin.) 

Wart after compound applied

Wart after compound applied

It’s a simple liquid that is applied with a Q-tip directly onto the affected area and surrounding tissue, and within several hours it produces a large fluid-filled blister.  The pressure of the fluid in the blister causes a fair amount of pain, so after 24 hours, I was instructed to lance the blister to relieve the pressure. (Thanks, John, for providing useful and safe lancing techniques! :) )

The idea behind this treatment is that the blistering agent essentially kills the underlying tissue including the diseased sections, and then the blister sloughs off normally.  During the previous attempts, by the time the tissue sloughed off, the remaining bits of the wart had gone deeper and we were never able to completely remove it, thus the surgery.

For the latest wart, I had the idea to simply remove the roof of the blister (hopefully along with the diseased tissue), and repeat as soon as possible until the wart was gone.  I discussed it with my doctor and we decided to proceed.  This technique worked quite well.  I went through three rounds of treatments, about 9 days apart, and was wart-free in just under a month.

Each treatment was similar.  The solution was applied at the doctor’s office.  The blister formed in about 4 hours. 

After removal of blistered skin

After removal of blistered skin

I lanced and drained the blister, then cut around the borders of the tissue to remove the roof. Then I just treated the area as a regular blister without its roof: Neosporin and a large bandage.  I changed the bandage regularly until it was no longer oozing.  By this point, I could see how much of the wart remained, and then made another appointment.  Of course, I watched very carefully for any signs of infection.  As an orienteer (cross-country running/navigation), I’ve had many blisters rub off during competitions, so this was nothing new for me.

It’s been one year since the treatments, and there is no visible or tactile reminder.  Comparing the surgery to this approach, it’s a no-brainer which I would prefer.  For surgery, I was under general anesthesia and then on Tylenol/codeine for several days, it took about two months to heal the excised depression, I had to get a temporary Disabled Parking Placard, and I still have scar tissue.  For the blistering agent, I had about 6 days (2 days x 3 treatments) of a raw open wound, but it usually didn’t hurt after that, and no scars.

I’ve attached two pictures for comparison.

My comment: In each picture you can see the wart in the center. It’s important to understand what Brad says about how the two treatments differ. If you have had warts and tried over the counter treatments, without success, Brad’s story can help you.

 

Blister Repair – Your Way or Their Way?

July 29, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Uncategorized 

One of my goals is to educate athletes about good foot care techniques. You may recall blog posts where I stress the importance of knowing how to do foot care and importantly, to know what’s best for your feet.

I recently received an email from Rob, asking for some advice. Here’s Rob’s email:

I have been running a modest 30 miles a week for a few years. Last weekend we attended a tennis camp and during the first night of drills during ball pick up (not during a drill or competitive play) another player smacked a ball in to the arch of my foot from a shot distance away causing severe pain. I played through the pain and the next morning I asked the trainer to tape up my bruised arch, which she did. I played all day and at the end of the day there was a blister in the center of my foot between the taped and un-taped area. I went back to the trainer in the morning and she created a donut shaped pad about a 1/4-inch thick and taped it to my foot. I took out my shoe arch supports and played for another 1/2 day in a bit of pain. When I took off the shoe, sock, and bandage and pad I found that the blister had filled with liquid to the size of donut hole – now a huge blister about the size of a silver dollar and 1/4-inches thick. The camp staff took picture as the biggest tennis-related blister they had seen. I went back to the trainer at the college and she drained about half of the liquid out of the blister and we decided I was done playing tennis for the rest of the camp. I’m not sure going to the trainer really helped and I probably should have had your book along as reference and taped myself up. Now I am back home and have a huge blister on the bottom of my foot. 

This is a case where the trainer patched Rob’s blister the best way she knew how. It was an “old-school” patch job. A piece of moleskin cut in a donut shape with a hole in the middle for the blister. There may have been Vaseline on the center, and then tape or gauze over the top.

The problem with this old-school method is that it adds bulk to the foot – that can easily alter the person’s gait. This gait change can lead to further problems. At the same time, the patch can cause irritation, expanding the original blister or leading to new blisters.

Rob’s experience shows there is a long ways to go to get everyone up to speed about good blister care. I’d bet that if Rob had been prepared, he could have done a better job then the trained did. It’s hard to go everywhere with a blister patch kit in hand, but here’s my recommendation. Make up several simple kits and put them in Zip-Lock bags and stash one in your car and another in your gear bag. Fill the kits with your choices of blister tapes and patches. Then of course, make sure you know the best way to patch any blisters that may develop.

Here’s where to start – pages 228 to 256 in the 5th edition of Fixing Your Feet. If you don’t have a copy, or have an old edition, my suggestion is to get the new one. My home page has a link to Amazon if you need one. I was amazed at Badwater in Death Valley a few weeks ago. One of the runners had me autograph a copy of the 2nd edition. So much changes from edition to edition that it’s a small price to pay to help your feet.

Merry Christmas from Fixing Your Feet

December 23, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Books 
Fixing Your Feet

Fixing Your Feet

Feet are a big part of my life. For the past 15 years, Fixing Your Feet has introduced me to great people. I have enjoyed helping runners at events like Western States; Badwater in Death Valley; Primal Quest in Colorado, California and Washington; Raid the North Extreme in BC Canada; the TransRockies in Colorado; Racing the Planet Atacama in Chile; the Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica; the Avon Walk; the Susan G. Komen 3-Day Breast Cancer Walk; and others. In all these events, I have worked on thousands of feet. In addition, I have responded to an uncounted number of emails from folks asking for foot care advice.

The best part has been the people I have met. Runners, hikers, adventure racers, walkers, and their crews. Athletes walking a fine line between making a cutoff in a race, front runners, back of the pack runners, short and long distance hikers, solo and in groups – all ages. Athletes with a simple blister and others with blisters all over. Athletes in pain, and those wanting to quit.

I can recall many of these people. I remember their stories. Some of you are in my stories. I have learned a lot from each person whose feet I have patched. I don’t pretend to know everything about feet. Together we have learned a lot. I thank each of you for what you have contributed to the Fixing Your Feet story.

I wish all my readers a fun, bright, delicious, warm and cozy, and loving Merry Christmas. I hope you can spend time with family and friends.

 

It Only Takes a Pebble

October 1, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care, Health 

There is an old Chinese proverb; “Failure results not from the length of the journey or the height of the mountain but the pebble in one’s shoe.”

We have all had it at some point – the pebble that is.

The infamous pebble

The infamous pebble

We are running or walking or hiking and feel a small irritant. We think to ourselves that maybe our sock bunched up. But, after a bit, we realize its something else. So we move our foot around a bit or kick it up against a rock or log, or maybe sideways on the ground. The hope is that that kick will move the irritating thing to the side where we won’t feel it.

Sometimes it works for a while. But it always comes back. We are always better off to stop, take off your shoes, and clear whatever the problem is. Even the smallest pebble can cause problems. It can start with a hot spot and develop into a blister. It can cause a hole to develop in the sock. It can tear into the insole’s covering.

So stop and remove it.

Several weeks ago I was at the Gold Rush Adventure Race and encountered a similar situation. One of the racers came into the transition area and in the process of changing socks, I told her I’d clean out her shoes. The race route had taken runners through muddy areas and some had gone down into her shoes.

As I used my hands to clean inside her shoes, I found very rough hard edges under both heels. I thought it was a defect or tear in the insole. Surprisingly, it was hardened mud that was so hard, it took a lot of pressure to remove it from the insole. This must have hurt through the socks – but the racer had not bothered to clear out her shoes.

In reality, it might be a pebble – or mud. In either case, you are always better off to take a moment and get rid of the irritant.

Sample Engo Blister Prevention Patches?

March 12, 2009 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care 

Those of you who have followed me for while know I am a fan of ENGO Blister Prevention Patches. These slick oval patches are applied to your insoles or inside your shoes, to reduce friction.

An ENGO patch in the heel counter of a shoe

An ENGO patch in the heel counter of a shoe

I have applied them at many of the races where I have patched feet and have given away many as samples. The larger rectangles are great to apply to the front of an insole to reduce friction at the ball of the foot. When I have had an athlete with bad forefoot blisters or tender feet from hot spots, I will cut one to the shape of the insole. I have also used them under heels. The ovals are great for heels and sides of the foot – although getting them into the front of a shoe to relieve side of the foot friction takes work.

Jason M. Pawelsky, the Marketing & Sales Manager at Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, the makers of the patches, recently wrote me with an offer for my readers. Jason said, “I’d be happy to send a free ENGO Blister Prevention Patch sample to any Fixing Your Feet subscribers who emails me their contact information.” Here’s your chance for a free trial. Send your request to: info@goengo.com. In the subject line put: Happy Feet. Include your full name and snail mail address.

While you wait for your sample, check out the GoEngo website. They have a page of tips and techniques that is worth reading and shows typical applications.

ENGO’s adhesive is pressure-sensitive. Therefore, as pressure increases so does patch conformance & adherence. Patches will eventually need replacement. Replace your ENGO patch when the blue top layer wears through, or completely releases from, the white support layer. These patches can also be applied to your socks.

Over the years, I have narrowed the list of products I carry. Blister patches like those made by Spenco, are always in my bag. ENGO patches compliment whatever patch I have applied or a tape job. Wherever I go on a foot patching expedition, I always carry a supply of ENGO patches.

I invite you to give them a try. I have even suggested that runners take one of two and pin them to their bib number during a race (if they don’t have a small pack). That way you always have a patch handy for the unexpected hot spot or blister. You’ll make your feet happy!

Preventing Infection from Blisters

December 9, 2008 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Footcare, Footwear, Health, Sports, Travel 

Whether you get a blister
or several blisters, whether you drain them or not, you need to watch them for
signs of infection. If you pop a blister or you have a blister with its roof
torn off, once you have the chance, apply an antibiotic ointment.

Several years ago the news
carried a story about actress Hillary Swank. News sources disclosed that Swank
was nearly KO’d from the filming of
Million Dollar Baby due to a foot infection—from a blister. It appears
she popped the blister on her own and continued with her workouts. When the
pain increased, she found streaks going up her foot. Going to the doctor, she
learned the blister had become infected. Infection
There is a lesson here that we all
need to learn. Just as Swank thought a blister was a simple thing, as they
usually are, they can also become serious health issues. There have been several stories in the
past few months about athletes who have suffered serious illnesses due to
infections – including losing limbs.

For open blisters, using soap and water, and an antibiotic
ointment, Betadine, or hydrogen peroxide is important for avoiding infection.
Though you may not use these on an open blister during a run or in the middle
of the day while backpacking, at the end of the event or day, take the
necessary time to properly treat the open skin. Check your local drugstore for
a broad-spectrum antibiotic ointment like Neosporin or Polysporin that provides
protection against both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. Brave
Soldier Wound Healing Ointment is an excellent all-purpose salve to have on
hand for blister care during an event. ZombieRunner.com has offers this under Foot Care, Miscellaneous.

Recheck blisters daily for signs of infection. An infected
blister may be both seen and felt. An infection will be indicated by any of the
following: redness, swelling, red streaks up the limb, pain, fever, and pus.
Treat the blister as a wound. Clean it frequently and apply an antibiotic
ointment. Frequent warm water or Epsom salt soaks can also help the healing
process. Stay off the foot as much as possible and elevate it above the level
of your heart. If the infection does not seem to subside over 24 to 48 hours,
see a doctor.

Calluses and 2nd Opinions

September 9, 2007 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Footcare, Footwear, Health, Sports, Travel 

Over the past weeks, I have shared much of my thinking on calluses. If you read the last post and went over to my Fixing Your Feet newsletter for August, you read about how calluses affected the Badwater race of Jon, a runner from Australia.
     Lest you think that what happened to Jon is an uncommon occurrence, I want to share an email I received from an adventure racer named Matt. He wrote:
     “I completely agree with your position on calluses. Certainly, they represent a natural response the body is making to an irritant but they should be managed. I’ve participated in multi-day adventure races and 24-hour Rogaine events and found my teammates that had calluses as protection from blisters had the worst blisters. I’m fortunate that I read and learned your thoughts on the subject or I’d been right there with a huge blister problem. While I can’t say I’ve not had a blister since I started managing differently, I’ve certainly lessened the potential cause. Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom.”
     The key to what he wrote is: “… my teammates that had calluses as protection from blisters had the worst blisters.”
     I have seen this time and time again. Calluses can offer a bit of protection against blisters, but the tradeoff is when you do blister with calluses, the blisters are bad. Often times they are larger and deeper since they are under the callused skin.
     Thanks Matt, I appreciate your comments. Thanks for the 2nd opinion.

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