Frostbite

December 31, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Foot Care, Health, Sports 

Athletes who are out in cold and wet conditions need to be watchful for frostbite.

Frostbite occurs when tissue actually freezes. Toes are particularly susceptible to this serious condition. Factors that contribute to frostbite include exposure to wind, wet skin (even from sweat), and tight socks and shoes that constrict blood flow.

Early signs of frostbite include numbness, a waxy or pale discoloration of the skin, the tissue becoming firm to the touch, and pain in the area. As the frostbite progresses, the skin gets paler and the pain ceases. Often frostbite will thaw on its own as the person keeps moving or gets into a warm environment and out of the wind, wet, and cold. As the tissue warms, there can be redness, itching, and swelling.

In severe cases of frostbite, the skin becomes immobile as it freezes with underlying tissue. Blisters can form with clear or milky fluid. Blisters filled with blood indicate deeper damage. While the skin may change color, or even darken, do not assume you will lose the toes. It may take weeks or months to know if amputation is necessary. Check with your physician as soon as possible to determine what care is necessary.

Be aware of moisture inside your shoes and socks in extreme cold conditions. Sweat and outside moisture can change to ice inside your socks, leading to frostbite.

Tips for Managing Frostbite

  • Do not rub your toes to warm them—that causes even more tissue damage.
  • Do not rub the frostbitten area.
  • Unless absolutely necessary, don’t walk on frostbitten feet or toes.
  • Get into a warm environment as soon as possible.
  • Immerse the affected area in lukewarm—not hot—water, or warm the affected area with the body heat from another person.
  • Do not use a heating pad, heat lamp, or the heat of a stove, fireplace, or radiator for warming.
  • Do not rewarm or thaw frostbite unless you are sure you can keep the area warm. It is important to remember that thawing the tissue and then allowing it to refreeze can be devastating. Get professional medical help if possible.
  • Dehydration will make you more susceptible to frostbite.

Lubricants – One Bad and Lots of Good

August 4, 2012 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: blister care, Foot Care Products, Health, Sports 

This post came about because of a Backpacker magazine article about skills. One of the items was about endurance and was for, “Blistered feet during a high-mileage trek.”

The tip was to, “… protect against hot spots by applying a skin lubricant like Vaseline to high-friction areas…”

I’m sorry, but I think Vaseline is a bad choice.

When I ran my first ultra, back around 1982, there was not a huge choice in lubricants so Vaseline was commonly used. But I learned very quickly that its stickiness helped it collect dust and grit, sand and dirt, and other things that found their way into your socks and shoes. Once absorbed into my socks, it also became stiff. I looked for an alternative and discovered Bag Balm, which I used for years.

Over the years, Vaseline has been surpassed by lubricants that are slicker without attracting “stuff’ that can cause hot spots and blisters, that last longer, that don’t cake up on your socks, and that are much more effective.

So, here’s my choice for a bad lubricant: Vaseline.

And here are my choices for good lubricants:

Sportslick Skin Lubricant 

  •             Tube
  •             Solid Stick
  •             Pocket Slick

BodyGlide 

  •             The Original Anti-Chafe Balm
  •             FootGlide Foot Formula
  •             Ant-Chafe with SPF 25 Balm
  •             BodyGlide Anti-Chafe for Her
  •             Liquefied Powder
  •             WarmFX Anti-Pain Balm

BlisterShield

  •             Powder
  •             Roll-On
  •             Towelettes

RunGuard

  •             Anti-Chafe Stick
  •             Anti-Chafe Stick, Sensitive Formula

Hydropel Sports Ointment

Bag Balm

Many of these are available through ZombieRunner. Click on “Anti-chafing & Skin Care.” I you are looking for a new lubricant, or want to try one of these, check them out through  ZombieRunner.

Disclosure: Clicking through to ZombieRunner and making a purchase credits me with a few pennies to support this website.